Saturday, September 19, 2015

Reading Bradbury [English 11]

"Let's become a paperless classroom!" As we read Bradbury's novel Fahrenheit 451, we will post our Reading Response Journals here.

BLOGGING PURPOSE:  Please write a paragraph that aims to enrich the reading of a fellow student who is both intelligent and attentive to this week’s assigned reading and to the academic expectations of this course.
DIRECTIONS: 
  • Your typed response should be between 175 and 300 words.
  • Your paragraph should focus on the assigned reading; the subject may be any literary matter that you studied in the reading: plot, style, theme, structure, imagery, allusion, character development, narrator reliability, rhetorical stance, and so on. 
  • A well-developed response always includes textual evidence (direct support) from the reading itself.
  • Title your post and include your word count.
  • Respond to two other posts.
T     When commenting on a student's post, use our "Form" and "Content" rubric.

183 comments:

  1. 2. At the beginning of this section, a catalog is used. This kind of literary device is used to list a large amount of things. In the case of this section, it is used to give the reader detailed imagery of the living room that Franny is in. The catalog describes how overcrowded the room is with furniture and the aging of the apartment.

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  2. Sarah Estes
    Reader Response Journal Two: Fahrenheit 451
    In Ray Bradbury’s book, Fahrenheit 451, Bradbury uses many different scenarios involving “face”. When Montag and Clarisse for the first time their farewell is nothing but confusing, but it shows that there will more than likely be another encounter where Montag will try to save his face that Clarisse has completely broken through. In “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” Goffman provides a clear meaning of farewells, “farewells sum up the effect of the encounter upon the relationship and show what the participants may expect of one another when they next meet,” (11 Goffman) showing the final words between Clarisse and Montag, “are you happy?”(10 Bradbury) to be a foreshadowing of their future encounters. This is only the beginning of Clarisse getting under Montag’s skin, and Bradbury shows this by the mysterious pieces Clarisse leaves Montag in their first farewell. “Good-bye…” (31 Bradbury) was the last goodbye Clarisse offered Montag before she didn’t appear the next few days. Bradbury used this technique to show that there was something hidden behind her words, and many people wouldn’t see that unless they physically were to go back and look at the meaning behind that last farewell. In Goffman’s terms, that would show Clarisse not setting up face for the next time her and Montag are together, so will they be together again?

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    1. Form:2
      Word choice is appropriate for the point you are trying to get across. As for grammar, be sure to use the citations at the end of your sentences.
      Content: 2
      Uses good examples to help justify your point. Next time you could follow your thesis more thoroughly.

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    3. Form: 2 It was put together quite well, just some sentences were a little off.
      Content: 3 It kept me interesting and definitely added to my understanding of the characters more, you contributed to my thoughts on Clarisse and how Bradbury uses Goffman's technique more.
      Comments; I loved it, but maybe next time you can make sure that it reads smoothly, but the idea behind it was great!
      Jessica Hines

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    4. Form: 2/3
      There was a good well rounded use of vocabulary. I did not understand the sentence "When Montag and Clarisse for the first time their farewell is nothing but confusing", I felt like it was missing a word between Clarisse and For, maybe meets. For the rest it was good, but I got confused on a couple of sentences.
      Content: 2/3
      There is a good use of evidence and evidence usage displayed throughout the paper. Maybe next time have the key points be more flowing and sentence structure more smooth.
      Comments: I enjoyed reading it, I understood your interruption of text.

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    5. Form: 2/3
      The word choices were very well selected and flow together beautifully; however, there were some confusing sentence here and there. I think it may be due to a mistype or missing certain article.
      Content: 2/3
      I was blown away, especially when you mention the good-bye between Montag and Clarisse. Your idea was very refreshing and I think if you had more time then you could make this even better.

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    7. Form 2:
      The word choices fit the topic well and were appropriate. However I found some typos such as "When Montag and Clarisse for the first time their farewell is nothing but confusing, but it shows that there will more than likely be another encounter where Montag will try to save his face that Clarisse has completely broken through." I believe you meant to say "When Montag and Clarisse met for the first time."

      Content: 3
      You used great examples from both the article and the novel. However, your citations are slightly incorrect. Citations should be written as follows: (Author #).
      Overall great dialectical journal. I liked the way you related saving face to the first time Montag met Clarisse.

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  5. Reader Response Journal 2: “Fahrenheit 451”
    Erving Goffman’s work and ideas can be related to many situations in Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, in which his characters attempt to “save face” or even “lose face”. Goffman states that for one to “lose face” means that they have been “out of face”, or to be “shamefaced” (Goffman 7). When Montag asked the firemen, “...burn our houses and our books.”, Captain Beatty asked, “You got some?” (Bradbury 34). This is an example of what Goffman describes as an “incident” (Goffman 8). Montag has on his face of a fireman, one who burns books and never reads them, let alone owns them. When called out by Captain Beatty and threatening his “face”, Montag quickly attempts to “save face” by insisting he does not own books. According to Goffman, Montag wants to “save face” because of his “pride and honor” of being a fireman (Goffman 8). He knows that if he is to own books, he will be rejected from society and his house would be burned. As Goffman said, he wants to “...avoid the hostility that may be directed...” if he loses face (Goffman 8).

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    1. Form:3
      Very put together and well thought out. Good amount of quotes from the book helping the reader understand exactly what you're saying.
      Content:3
      Any reader who would come across this would be able to decipher what you're saying. They would understand this topic without needing to read the the book and article them self.

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    3. Form: 3

      The flow of the writing kept me interested as your transitions and grammar was well put together.

      Content 3: Your provided accurate examples to back up your thesis. I saw nothing I would highly improved as this well written. The only thing I would possibly change would be how you summed up the journal, maybe restate the thesis and or summarize the journal, then again that's just my opinion. Great job. - Ryan Underwood

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    4. Forum: 3/3 You used a lot of quotes to express your points and thesis throughout the essay.

      Content: 3/3 Easy to understand and really explains how they are similar.

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  7. Dialectal Journal 2: The Revealing of the characters “face”
    In my English 11 Honors class we have been talking about “Revealing Face” which we have gotten from reading an article by the author, Goffman. So we then applied his article to Ray Bradbury’s book Fahrenheit 451, and discovered that Ray uses a lot of “face” inside the novel for almost every character. For example, Mildred had overdosed on sleeping pills attempting to commit suicide, Montag had to inform her of this. But instead also started to try and save her “face” by saying “ Maybe you took two pills and forgot and took two more, and forgot again and took two more, and were so dopey you kept right on until you had thirty or for forty of them in you.” (17 Bradbury) This is symbolizing that Montag could have removed her face but instead saved by telling her that she could have forgot each time. This is also representing that Mildred is depressed in a sense which makes it seem that this world Ray has created, almost everyone is depressed. Besides the fact that Mildred overdosed, Montag expressed how he felt in the story as well. For example, “And she ran off and left him standing there in the rain. Only after a long time did he move. And then, very slowly, as he walked, he tilted his head back in the rain, for just a few moments, and opened his mouth….” (21 Bradbury) This, for the last thing, also shows that Montag is slowly starting to be opened minded. In the end, though we have discovered that Ray Bradbury uses a lot of “face” in his novel of Fahrenheit 451.

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    1. Form:2
      You have a few punctuation errors revolving around putting a period after "(21 Bradbury)" but have a strict in which you carry the reader continuously.
      Content:3
      I like the way you explain both quotes thoroughly and contently, but you could of used quotes from Goffman's article.

      -Cole Smith

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    2. Form Score 3: Grammar was great, although you might have left out some commas. Everything else was pretty much perfect.

      Content Score: 3
      The essay is more of a summary. Although it does give good textual evidence. This response was different than any other that I have read. I didn't really think that everyone in the society is depressed.

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  8. Reader Response Journal: “Saving Face in Fahrenheit 451”
    In Erving Goffman’s article, “On-Face Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction”, he speaks about a tactic us humans all use in everyday situations, which is simply to “save face”. Saving face is in which people create or differ a personality in order to act differently in many situations in which they prefer not to disclose their true persona. This is seen frequently in Fahrenheit 451 as Guy Montag, as well as other characters, display this defense mechanism many times. In the novel, Montag is faced with a guilty conscience at the firehouse that causes him to become extremely nervous and save face in order to prevent speaking his mind (Bradbury, 30). Montag constantly is put in situations in which he has to pretend to be his old self, in which he was ignorant to the real world, yet he is now awake in society. “Face is an image of self-delineated in terms of approved social attributes” (Goffman, 7). Mildred has also displayed this technique of saving face. The morning after her medical emergency, she woke up with no clue of what truly happened the night before. Every time Montag would bring up the situation of Mildred attempting to commit suicide, she would constantly deny it and return to her script. “Heck, what would I want to go and do a silly thing like that for? I didn’t do that. Never in a billion years” (Bradbury 17). Whether this technique of “saving face” is expressed in a novel or in an everyday conversation, it cannot be denied that it’s a highly effective technique that can make the better of most situations.

    - Ryan Underwood

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    1. Form: 2. The piece follows the thesis well. It's smooth and understandable. Note that when you quote someone, make it clear who you're quoting.
      Content: 2 It's well thought of. Something that should be kept in mind while discussing and reading.

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    2. Form Score: 2
      This RRJ uses a good variety of sentence structures and syntax, and it has a good flow to the language that does not seem choppy or inhibiting to the reader. However, the thesis statement does not seem specifically stated, and the main idea does not seem apparent until the last sentence.
      Content Score: 1
      This RRJ shows a few points of the novel in which Goffman's theory is portrayed in _Fahrenheit 451_ that are relevant to the reader. However, the main idea is not apparent until the end, and when the main idea is shown, it is that saving face is a good technique, not that Bradbury uses it in order to accomplish a certain task in his novel.
      Comments:
      Overall, this piece shows a fair attempt at showing a relationship between the two articles, but it lacks a more analytical view of the novel, and the main point is not clearly stated. Though it is good at showing where face is used in the novel, it does not explain why Bradbury uses this technique.

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  10. Bradbury uses Ervin Goffman’s theory on face-work in his novel Fahrenheit 451 to ultimately show a change in Montag’s character through his interaction with Clarisse. In Goffman’s article, he mentions that, “Face-work serves to counteract ‘incidents’—that is, events whose effective symbolic implications threaten face” (Goffman 8). When Montag and Clarisse meet for the first time, one of these “incidents” occurs. At one point, Clarisse says, “’And you must be-…-the fireman.’ Her voice trailed off” (Bradbury 4). Montag is put off by how weirdly she says this, and he tries to kindly point out that she is not maintaining the right “face”, as Goffman calls it, by saying, “How oddly you say that” (Bradbury 4). This is one of those “incidents” where Montag is put off and his calm, detached face is threatened. An even bigger impact to Montag’s face is when Clarisse poses the big question, “’Are you happy?’” (Bradbury 7). This makes Montag lose face immediately, saying “’Am I what?’ he cried” (Bradbury 7). He reacts with a lot of emotion, breaking the face that he usually maintains. This further changes him when he is alone, and he realizes that, “He was not happy. He was not happy” (Bradbury 9). At this point, all of the incidents he faced with Clarisse have built up and they break him. His character has been ultimately changed, though his multiple faces while with other people may not change.
    Word Count: 237

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    1. Form: 3
      The writting is very clear but needs more details on what face means.
      Content: 3
      The essay uses many examples from the book and the article given however you should've explained how Montag's characted changed and towards who.

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    2. Form: Had a few grammatical errors. Set up of paper is nicely done. 2/3

      Content: Logical argument 2/3

      Comments: Sometimes was hard to follow, I understood what you were trying to say, maybe try grouping multiple example together and then explaining how he defended his face. It seemed very choppy. OVERALL, great topic and great piece!!!

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  11. Dialectical Journal, by Cole Smith
    In the novel, Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury, the article “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction,” by Erving Goffman shows how face work comes into play. Initially, “I’m sorry. I really thought you were having fun at my expense. I’m a fool” (Bradbury 28-29). Clarisse attempts to save Motaq’s face here so he doesn’t feel uncomfortable. Not only does Motaq, a proud fireman who loves his job, break face but continues on with it knowing he feels personal about the topic. Furthermore, “Face-Work serves to counteract ‘incidents’- that is, events whose effective symbolic implications threaten face” (Goffman 8). People fear what others would truly think of them so they hide it in order to prevent isolation. Motaq is an example of this do to the fact that he responded with “No, no” (Bradbury 31) when questioned by his fellow coworker. Lastly, “Motaq, you forgot your helmet” (Bradbury 35). Motaq has lost his face he perceived to his coworkers. Over time Motaq has lost his true identity of who he was. In the novel, Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury, and the article “On Face Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction,” by Erving Goffman coexist with each other like two peas in a pot.

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    1. Form: 2
      You have few grammatical errors, other than that, you got many quotes which is good to back up what you have to say.

      Content: 3
      I liked your examples and how you applied them to Montag and his coworker.

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  12. Reader Response Journal: Ray Bradbury
    In pages 24-35 we can see many different types of faces, as described in the article, “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction.” This article relates to Fahrenheit 451 because Montag tries to save face multiple times when Clarisse begins to ask him questions about his happiness and life. Many people create their face by how society sees them. Once we take on a face we are expected to live up to it. Depending on what face we have on, and where we’re at, it might vary. We all have multiple faces. We have a face at home, one we use at school, the one we show our friends, and the one that only we ourselves know. Of course there are many more, but those are just a few.
    ”He wore his happiness like a mask and the girl had to run off across the lawn with a mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back.”(12) This quote shows that Clarisse was able to make Montag take off the mask that he shows to society. He showed her, his true self, and he couldn’t take it back now, there was no possible way of doing so. “He tried to conjure up a face to fit the words, but there was no face.”(22) Montag felt special around Clarisse and when he tried to put on a face, he couldn’t. There wasn’t a face for him to choose from. He felt as if she was different; he didn’t have to be that uptight fireman, who only loved his job and that’s it. He felt like he could share his life with her and be 100% honest about everything.

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    1. Form: 3/3
      Very well written, good use of evidence, and evidence explained well and in an interesting way.
      Content: 2/3
      Well put and interesting. I like the way you use the evidence. However, the could be more clearly related to the thesis.

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    2. Form: Not many grammatical errors 3/3
      Content: Good argument. At times was very hard to follow. 2/3
      Comments: Definitely use more quotes from Goffman's article. In the beginning make sure you say page 24-35 in F541, I was unsure if you were talking about Goffman's or Bradbury's. You also explain how his faces change but do not explain how he defended his face. OVERALL: I knew where you were going with it and it is a very good topic.

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    3. I really liked this piece! It had a very good word choice and great evidence used to support your thesis.
      ~Heather Lytle-Flood

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  13. Form Score: 2
    Try to add the article in the beginning of your paragraph.
    Content Score: 3
    It kept me interested the whole time and had a lot of info involving the "face".
    Comment: Its a very good piece, not much to change, I could identify the thesis very well. Keep it up.

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  14. Reader Response Journal: Fahrenheit 451
    In Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, the three main characters: Montag, Mildred, and Clarisse McClellan, avoid losing face throughout the book. The term face means the value a person gives themselves by the line others assume he has taken during a conversation or interaction. Throughout our daily lives we often change faces according to the situation we are in or the people we are around. Bradbury talks about face on page 22 where he wrote, " He tried to conjure up a face to fit the words but there was no face." Bradbury wrote this to indicate that Montag found himself not able to come up with a face that would suit the situation making him almost lose face in front of Clarisse. Earlier in the novel it also says "He wore his happiness like a mask and the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back"(12). In this text Bradbury is trying to explain how Clarisse McClellan makes it difficult for Montag to keep his face and his identity.
    Word Count: 207

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    1. Form: This response had a nice, smooth flow to it. In terms of word choice, you chose very intellectually, high level terms which proved your overall knowledge and credibility towards your topic. 2/3

      Content: This was very thought provoking, it pushed me to think outside the box. I feel even more of a connections and analysis between the two pieces of writing could be helpful as well. 2/3

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    2. Form: 1 The ideas of the response were good, but the sentences did not flow
      Content: 2 The thesis of the response is very clear, but it does not tell us how it relates to Evring Goffmans term face, and none of Goffman's terms are cited

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  15. Sarah Burr
    Reader Response Journal: Fahrenheit 451
    “Saving face” is something everybody does, because it’s human nature to want to appear “normal”. In Fahrenheit 451, we see many people trying to save face throughout the book. For example, the main character Montag; he saves face multiple times, for instance, when Montag realizes he isn’t happy, and he wants to find a way to be happy, but he can’t because then he would “lose face”, “He wore his happiness like a mask, and the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask, and there was no way of going to on her door and ask for it back,” (12). Montag can’t go get the mask for two reasons, one, it is a metaphorical mask, and two, because if he were able to get it back, everyone would be able to see he was unhappy, thus causing him to lose face. Mildred also attempts to save face when she takes all of her sleeping pills in an attempt to kill herself. When Montag asks her about it she says, “I wouldn’t do a thing like that. Why would I do a thing like that?” (19). Montag can tell that she is attempting to save face, and he even helps her so she doesn’t feel bad; “maybe you took two pills and forgot and took two more, and were so dopey you kept right on until you had thirty or forty of them in you.” (19). Here Mildred displays how it really is human nature to “save face” so you don’t look bad in front of others. These are just a few examples of how Bradbury’s characters showing how it is human nature to “save face”.
    Word Count: 295

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    1. Form: 2/3 There are a few sentences that can be rearranged to make more sense. You use quotations in places that help the reader understand what you are trying to say better.
      Content: 3/3 The critical thinking of the how the novel and article relate to each other are apparent in your essay. The reasons as to why Montag can't get his face back make the essay excel a bit more.

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  16. Jessica Hines
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, period 5
    29 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal: Fahrenheit 451
    Ray Bradbury uses Goffman’s “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” in order to show the reader Montag’s gradual true face reveal. Goffman’s work summarizes a social interact meant with other people who slowly lose their face or gain their face in public. “Fool, thought Montag to himself, you’ll give it away.”(Bradbury 34). Bradbury uses Goffman’s technique to show that Montag has started to think for himself and question the society which he lives in. “Five, six, seven days. And then Clarisse was gone”(Bradbury 32). Montag is starting to count the days waiting for Clarisse to arrive and speak her perspective on society. From this quote you can clearly see that Montag has started to become interested in Clarisse and her little everyday talks about how she’s different than everybody else. Montag soon starts thinking like her too. “He opened his mouth and it was Clarisse McCellan saying Didn’t firemen prevent fires rather than stoke them up and get them going?”(Bradbury 34). You can see here that Montag isn’t just starting to lose face but also to think like an individual, and not just any individual, like Clarisse. Bradbury uses Goffman’s idea to showcase how Montag is questioning he’s face in society.

    Word Count: 234

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  17. Reader Response Journal: _Fahrenheit 451_
    Bradbury uses Goffman’s theory to show that Milly was trying to save face by lying to her husband, Guy Montag, about her suicide attempt. Goffman’s theory is that “face is an image of self-delineated in terms of approved social attributes” (Goffman 3). In this section of _Fahrenheit 451_, Milly tries to commit suicide by consuming a whole bottle of sleeping pills. The morning after the incident, Guy started to ask Milly about her suicide attempt and she immediately began lying. Milly said things like, “Oh, I wouldn’t do that” (Bradbury 17) and “I didn’t do that, never in a billion years” (Bradbury17). Milly continued to lie to Guy because she did not want to lose face by admitting that she tried to kill herself. Guy even tried to help Milly save face by offering a way out, saying, “maybe you took two pills and forgot and took two more, and forgot again and took two more, and were so dopey you kept right on until you had thirty or forty of them in you” (Bradbury 17). Milly still continued to lie even after Guy offered her an explanation to her action. Because Milly was so focused on saving face, she did not even realize that her suicide attempt might have hurt Guy.

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    1. Form: Easy to read, well flowing 2/3
      Content: Good use of quotes and good use of both texts. 2/3

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    3. Form:2 very well written could have used a higher level of vocabulary
      Content:3 the parallels between the two articles are easy to follow and bring new perspective to me as a reader

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  18. Colleen Rawlins
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H, Period: 4
    24 September, 2015
    In the article by Erving Goffman “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” one can compare characters from the novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury to Goffman’s words of one to qualify as saving face. “No. Houses have always been fireproof, take my word for it” (Bradbury8). Montag expresses his knowledge that has been thought to him and the whole society. Clarisse response back to him “Strange. I heard once that a long time ago houses used to burn by accident and they needed firemen to stop the flames” (Bradbury 8). They follow what Goffman wrote in his article, “Once the person initially presents a line, he and the others tend to build their later responses upon it, and in a sense become stuck with it. Should the person radically alter his line, or should it become discredited…” (Goffman8). This implies that just because Montag makes a statement that Clarisse disagrees with doesn’t mean he should withdraw it. “You’re not in love with anyone” (Bradbury 22) is what Clarisse acknowledges Montag after doing the dandelion test. After Montag argues that he is in love then Clarisse agrees and apologizes. “I have already said that the person has two points of view…Toward saving his own face and a protective orientation toward saving the other face” (Goffman 9). This entails that Montag was saving his own face, but as well Clarisse was saving his with trying to save hers.

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    1. I like how you, in the beginning establish a common ground for the article and the book by telling that you can compare the characters from the book to goffmans words.

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  19. Shelby Neidert
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, period 4
    1 October 2015
    Reader Response Journal: “On Face-Work”
    In the article titled “On Face-Work an Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction”, Erving Goffman discussed two key phrases that are present in Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451; “to lose face,” and “to save one’s face.” Goffman said, “ The combined effect of the rule of self- respect and the rule of considerateness is that the person tends to conduct himself during an encounter so as to maintain both is own face and the face of the other participants.”(Goffman 7) In other words; when presented with the company of another person, you start to preform using one of the many faces and scripts that you possess. There are many instances where Montag tries to “save face,” and preform. One being an early encounter that he had with Clarisse. Montag became very defensive when Clarisse asked “Are you happy?”(Bradbury 10) He immediately answered, and acted as if he was appalled for being asked such a ridiculous question. He responded very quickly and in a stern tone “Happy! Of all the nonsense.”(Bradbury 10) This was a time where he tried to save his face, but for a moment he dropped his face and “lost it” when he really began to absorb the question. Montag went off of script when he began to think about the question. He had always been a very stolid man, with not much deeper meaning; on the outside that is. Once meeting Clarisse, and diving into his deeper thoughts and emotions he realized that he really wasn’t happy. “He wore his happiness like a mask that the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back.” (Bradbury 12) That was, among many, the first time that Montag “lost face.”
    Word Count: 300 

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    1. Content: 3 Great topic and example from the novel
      Form: 2 Flowed nicely and was easy to pick out the main idea

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    2. Form: 2 i liked how everything was organized and clear.
      Content: 3 It was very helpful that you explained the quote from the article because it can be confusing.
      I enjoyed it good job

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  20. Reader Response Journal: “On Face-Work”
    Throughout the first 24 pages, Ray Bradbury demonstrates three characters saving or losing one’s own face to stay on script (Goffman 7). To save face means to “designate the actions taken by a person to make whatever they are doing consistent with face” (Goffman8) When Clarisse asked, “Are you happy?” Montag replied with, “Of course I’m happy.” (Bradbury 10). Montag was saving face in this instance because inside he really isn’t because every day to him was mechanized. When he goes home and really thinks about the question he ponders about the society he lives in. and what he can do differently. “He was not happy. He was not happy. He said the words to himself.”(Bradbury 12).
    Ray Bradbury shows Mildred trying to save her face as well. “’Didn’t sleep well. Feel terrible,” she said. “God, I’m hungry. I can’t figure it.” “Last night—“he said again. She watched his lips casually. “What about last night?” “Don’t you remember?” “What?’” (Bradbury 18) Mildred didn’t want to admit to trying to overdose to Montag, instead she tried to blow it off like nothing ever happened. She wanted to stick to her script in her role as a wife and person in society doing her job.
    Clarisse losing face when she said, “I’m seventeen and I’m crazy.” (Bradbury 7) Most people wouldn’t ever say that because it goes against the social norms. It’s to show her character is different from the rest of society, and to allow her to be different. She also is the reason for Montag to start thinking about how corrupt everything else is, and this allows him to be himself instead of a robot like all the others in their town.

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    1. Form: Great flowing and easy to read 2/3
      Content: Use of plenty of examples and gave perfect examples of the different forms of "face" 3/3

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    2. Form: 2
      I found it very well written! However I don't see what you are citing in your first citation because there are no quotation marks.
      Content: 3
      You used a plethora of examples that I found to greatly strengthen your thesis.
      Overall this is a very well written dialectical journal and I am looking forward to reading your next one!

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  22. Hunter Schneiter
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, Period 5
    24 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal 2
    The book Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury can compare to the article by Erving Goffman called On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction, by giving the idea of a “face” or a “script” that certain people in certain situations will use to keep up a social status or standing. Goffman’s idea of a “face” can relate to Montag and Clarisse’s conversations, Clarisse constantly forces Montag to protect his “face” to keep up the idea that he is a fireman. In the conservation that Clarisse and Montag had, Clarisse asks Montag “Is it true that long ago fireman put fires out instead of going to start them?”(Bradbury, 8) this question makes Montag laugh and brush the question off. Montag laughing is a technique that Goffman says is to protect Montag’s reputation and “face” as a fireman. Goffman says “to lose face seems to mean to be in wrong face, to be out of face, or to be shamefaced”(Goffman, 7) this means that one person does not want to lose their face otherwise, they will become “shamefaced” and embarrassed, so Montag laughing at Clarisse’s comment is his tactic to protect himself from being “shamefaced”. Throughout the entire story of Fahrenheit 451, Montag is faced with moments where he has to protect his “face” to keep up his social status as a fireman.

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    Replies
    1. Form: 2
      The flow was good and the clarity was exceptional. However, the grammar was uncertain in the beginning.
      Content: 2
      The textual evidence given was solid and detailed, however try to incorporate more examples to support your thesis.
      Great job!

      Delete
    2. Form: 3
      Great thesis and organization!

      Contents: 2
      You could use more examples to really engage the two works of literature.

      Delete
    3. Form: 2 You need to italicize titles of books and put quotation marks around the title.
      Content: 2 Could have used more examples, however gave good solid evidence.

      Delete
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    Replies
    1. Form: Slight grammar errors like quotes are needed around the title of the article, and commas are needed in some areas.Some words aren't clear in the context.Just consider revising, but your response is generally easy to understand. 2
      Content: I liked how you discussed the differences between the way that the two talk differently to each other than they would around others. Perhaps give an example of how they would talk with other people. 2

      Delete
    2. Form: Overall, you used grammar and spelling effectively. A few necessary commas are missing, and some extra words are used that could be removed. Your point is made clear towards the end of this piece.
      Score:2

      Content: I liked the way you used supporting quotes that accumulated to make your thoughts complete. Some details could be added to make it even more interesting. Overall good job!
      Score:2

      Delete
  24. Samantha Simmons
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 Honors, period 5
    1 October 2015
    Reader’s Response Journal: “On Face- Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” and Fahrenheit 451.
    Erving Goffman’s Dramaturgy about lines and save face relate to Bradbury’s characters, Guy Montag and Clarisse McClellan, in Fahrenheit 451 through the way they act and behave around one another. When Guy Montag is around his co-firemen and wife he plays the typical tough fireman, or ideal societal man “act,” but around Clarisse he drops the “act.” Page 29 proves this by saying,” He felt at ease and comfortable.” This version of Guy Montag is entirely different to the Montag on page one that enjoys burning, and destroying, books and houses. Page 28 says,” You make me feel very old and very much like a father.” With Clarisse. Montag puts on his friendly, fatherly face. When Montag is around Clarisse he doesn’t have to worry about “losing face,” or having to defend himself. Clarisse and Montag have a unique and very extraordinary relationship in the way they act, behave, and converse with each other.
    Word Count: 186

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    1. Form: I really enjoyed the word choice, fantastic job on that. It could perhaps be a bit longer. 3/3
      Content: This really explored Montag's and Clarisse's relationship wonderfully. It had nice textual support. 3/3

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    2. Form:
      I liked how the entire journal had a really good flow to it in the way you presented your examples. 3/3
      Content:
      I feel it really connected the 2 articles because the entire thing had relevance to your thesis statement. 3/3

      Delete
    3. Form:This is a very well written piece and grammar was used correctly. The only thing that possibly could be revised is adding where the quote was from after the quote.3/3
      Content: The thesis was very clear and the paper was interesting and easy to follow. One thing that might be altered is adding more textual evidence about how Montag acts differently around the firemen and Mildred compared to Clarisse. 2/3

      Delete
  25. Kira Mower
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H - period 5
    1 October 2015

    Reader Response Journal #2: “Fahrenheit 451 (11-35)”

    In this installment of Fahrenheit 451, author Ray Bradbury uses characters Guy Montag and Clarisse McClellan to show social interactions and how people “save face” and “lose face”. As defined by Erving Goffman: “...the phrase “to lose face” seems to mean to be in the wrong face, to be out of face, or to be shamefaced. The phrase “to save one’s face” appears to refer to the process by which the person sustains an impression…” (Goffman 7). The character that seems the most involved with “saving face” is Montag, as shown: “‘I am very much in love!’ He tried to conjure up a face to fit the words, but there was no face.” (Bradbury 22). This passage shows Montag getting defensive after McClellan has teased him about not being in love with his wife due to the dandelion game. Montag tries to save face by arguing that he is in love with his wife and that the dandelion wasn’t working right. He doesn’t want to admit to McClellan and, more importantly- to himself, that he might not actually be in love with his wife because it would make himself look bad and he would “lose face” because he would not be society’s ideal image of what a man, especially a firefighter, should be.

    Word Count: 213

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    Replies
    1. Form: Excellent use of citations. 3/3
      Content: I appreciate that you brought up Montag possibly doubting whether or not he loves his wife and how you tied it into "saving face." It really made me stop and think. 3/3

      Delete
  26. Mallory Gilbert
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, p.5
    24 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal
    In Fahrenheit 451 it demonstrates the theory that Erving Goffman states in the essay On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction, the theory being: people will go through great length to “save face”(Goffman 1) if they are “to lose face” (Goffman 1). In Fahrenheit 451 characters are constantly “saving face” (Goffman 1) so that they can go along with the socially acceptable face that they follow and represent. When Clarisse asks Montag “are you happy” (Bradbury) Montag gets extremely defensive and comes back with “Happy! Of all nonsense” (Bradbury 10) and then laughs it off. Montag was “saving face”(Goffman 1) in this conversation because he was rejecting what she said and laughing it off making it seem like he was very happy, like all the people should be according to society. Montag’s wife Mildred “saves face”(Goffman 1) when she overdosed on pills and had to get medical attention, then the next day when Montag confronted and asked her about it she quickly responds with “oh, I wouldn’t do that” (Bradbury 19) and “ I wouldn’t do a thing like that. Why would I do a thing like that?”(Bradbury 19) Mildred was denying and acting surprised so she could “save face” (Goffman 1) and that Montag wouldn’t think she had tried to overdose. Many people “save face”(Goffman 1) every day so that they can go along with what is socially acceptable so their face doesn’t get negatively altered. In Fahrenheit 451 it shows examples of people “saving face” (Goffman 1) to fit to the social norm, which helps people understand how the society works in the novel.
    Word count: 270

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    Replies
    1. Form: 2/3 Clear thesis and great wrapup, but the use of words could vary a bit more and be a bit more interesting. Sometimes the flow of words is a bit iffy.

      Content: 3/3 I enjoy that you didn't focus simply on "saving face" or "
      losing face" but the article and its theories overall.

      Delete
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    1. Form:Good restatement of thesis at the end and good transitions. 2/3
      Content: Very good content. Essay really shows the useful ways Bradbury utilizes Goffman's social science theories. Good use of examples from both texts. 3/3

      Delete
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    Replies
    1. Form: You have very good word choice and add evidence very smoothly.
      Content: Your thesis is backed up by adequate evidence and it sounds very scholarly.

      Delete
    2. Form:
      I really liked the compare and contrast format you used throughout the entire thing and it did not seem like a summary at all to me. 3/3
      Content:
      The quotes you used from Bradbury and Goffman really seem like they are connected and are really good supporters of each other. 3/3

      Delete
  30. Kayla Narciso
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H, period 05
    24 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal #2
    Erving Goffman’s article, “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” focuses on elements of dramaturgy and influences most of the characters in Ray Bradbury’s novel, _Fahrenheit 451_. Goffman terms “face” as “the positive social value a person effectively claims for himself by the line others assume he has taken during a particular contact” (Goffman, 7). Every person has the goal to “save face” (lecture notes), which means to maintain a good impression of one’s self, including the characters of Clarisse McClellan, Mildred, and Guy Montag. McClellan has already “lost face” (lecture notes) since she is seen as an outcast in the current society and is looked down upon. Her “abnormal” character is portrayed when she says, “I like to smell things and look at things, and sometimes stay up all night, walking, and watch the sun rise” (Bradbury, 7). Because she participates in those activities, McClellan has lost face in the society. On the contrary, there is an attempt to save face when Mildred denies the fact that she tried to kill herself the night before, “What about last night?” (Bradbury, 19). Montag is one of the first characters to show the reader his “back stage” (lecture notes) when he is alone after Mildred’s treatment. The quote, “One drop of rain. Clarisse…All rushing on down around in a spouting roar and rivering stream toward morning,” (Bradbury, 17-18) shows Montag at his back stage moment when he is weeping. Finally, Montag almost loses face to other firemen when he nearly admits to having read a book, “At the last fire, a book of fairy tales, he’d glanced at a single line,” (Bradbury, 34) because no one is allowed to read books in this society. Goffman’s article and theory of dramaturgy is allows Bradbury to fully develop his characters.
    Word count: 300

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    1. Form: 3
      Great organization, punctuation, and flow!

      Content: 3
      Nice usage of both literatures and cooperating them in your journal.

      Delete
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  32. Reader Response Journal #2: “On Face-Work”
    In Ray Bradbury’s book, Fahrenheit 451, the character Montag proves Goffman’s research through the way he “performs” around others. Bradbury supports Goffman’s work when he says, “(Montag) tried to conjure up a face to fit the words, but there was no face.”(Bradbury 22) This is because Montag is showing his defensive orientation due to the fact that Clarisse is trying to make him lose face by saying he isn’t in love with anyone. He gets very defensive, saying he most definitely is in love, but when he tries to match his face to his action of saying that he is in love he can’t pull the face out of his “…repertoire of face-saving practices.”(Goffman 8) Goffman has a statement on this where he says, “By face-work I mean to designate the actions taken by a person to make whatever he is doing consistent with face.”(Goffman 8) Deducting from this quote and Montag’s quote, you can see how the two different literary works line up almost perfectly with each other. This is how Bradbury’s description of the character Montag’s actions proves Goffman’s research in his article, “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction”.
    Word Count: 200

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  34. Quincy Strasser
    Ms. Bugni
    English 11H, Period 5
    24 September 2015

    Reader Response Journal: Fahrenheit 451

    Erving Goffman's dramaturgical model of social life becomes extremely evident in Ray Bradbury's __Fahrenheit 451__. When Clarisse accuses Montag of not being in love with anyone he responds by saying, ""I am, very much in love!' He tried to conjure up a face to fit the words, but there was no face. 'I am"' (Bradbury 22). One might question why Montag can easily exhibit such an exuberant and amorous face in the context of burning books, but not in the context of the love and passion he potentially should experience towards his wife. When Montag sets a house with books in it on fire, the author specifically points out his "fierce grin" (Bradbury 4) and "the fiery smile" that "gripped his face muscles, in the dark" (Bradbury 4). Clarisse has inadvertently illuminated Montag with his own subconscious, and has unmasked Montag's “front stage” (Lecture Notes) and “back stage” (Lecture Notes) faces. When Montag is “back stage”, in a tranquil and solitary environment, he shows great joy towards burning books; this is where he places his true love. When he has his “front stage” face on he acts as if he is in love with his wife because that is what society stipulates. Montage formally performs and adheres to conventions that have meaning to his audience, in this case Clarisse. After being subjected to hypothetical ridicule, he goes into defensive mode. As Goffman would say, he "defends his own face and protects the face of the other" (Goffman 9-10). He does not want to present a bad impression of himself, or his wife for that matter. Through Goffman's dramaturgical model of social life, Montag's true self is exposed not only to Clarisse, but Montag himself.
    Word Count: 299

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    1. Form: 3/3 I saw a grammatical error or two, but I believe it was due to the copy/pasting. Wonderful word choice, perfectly stated thesis. Is clear, and keeps the reader's attention.

      Content: 3/3 Great direct comparison to the article. I enjoy how you didn't necessarily focus on one "face" or "losing face", but the theory overall.

      Delete
    2. Form: I loved your syntax, and I thought that the paragraph flowed smoothly. Also, your thesis was shown throughout the entire body of your work. Good Job! 3/3
      Content: I loved your take between the two pieces, and I loved the different comparisons between the two. I would have never thought of your take on it. 3/3

      Delete
  35. Individuals don’t always go along with what society says is correct. In the article “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” by Erving Goffman and from the class lecture it was discussed that individuals have “face work” or the aspect of reputations where each individual works constantly to read off the scripts of that role. Each role (script) is for different aspects of life. The individual is, in a way, expected to conform to that script, as it is the “social norm”. In the book Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, Clarisse shows contradiction to this concept. “But they all say the same things and nobody says anything different from anyone else.”(Bradbury 31). The fact that she noticed that everyone is doing the exact same things shows that she doesn’t follow that script that she is expected to follow. When she is asked why she doesn’t go to school she responds “Oh, they don’t miss me…I’m antisocial, they say….I’m very social indeed. It all depends on what you mean by social doesn’t it?”(Bradbury 29). Clarisse is typed as odd and out of place because she doesn’t conform to the script that she has been given. She has her own ideas, and she doesn’t live by the ones she is given. “Dramaturgy: When a person come into the presence of other people they act the way society wants and expects” (lecture). Clarisse’s views on how things in the world should be are not the same as society’s, so she doesn’t follow Goffman’s ideas of face-work and dramaturgy. Montag has noticed this and her influence makes him observe the smaller things in his life. By doing this he starts reading off his script less and less.

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    1. Form: The form is really good and the word choice is grand. All the punctuation is in the right place. 3/3
      Content: The content is very insightful. It makes me think about the book. 3/3

      Delete
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    ReplyDelete
  37. Connor Correa
    Mrs.Bugni Per.5
    English 11 H
    1 October 2015
    Reader Response journal
    In the article, An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction by, Erving Goffman, he discusses how we all have many different faces for each and every social environment that we engage ourselves in. This article greatly relates to the passages that we have read in Fahrenheit 451 in many ways, such as when Clarisse first asks Guy “are you happy?” Bradbury (10)
    He begins to start thinking critically about the question she had asked. Now Guy is beginning to think for himself, he is beginning to become aquatinted with his genuine face or his true self. Another instance where Guy is forced to confront his genuine face is when he was alone with himself after listening in on Clarisse and the family talk, and when his wife had just tried to commit suicide. Guy was shedding tears for all of them and that was his true face coming forward from his backstage.
    Not only did Guy encounter his true face in these passages, but he also learns how to put on a false face when he finds himself in the fire house talking to his captain. Guy accidently brings up books and has to put on the false face to find a way out of the predicament that he put himself in. That very same face was also used when the mechanical hound was getting near Guy and could tell that he was hiding something from the other firemen.
    Word count:240

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    1. Your evidence runs very smoothly throughout your paper. I enjoyed reading this.

      Delete
    2. Form: 2/3
      I thought the response flowed generally well. I would use stronger vocabulary and more connecting words to avoid repeating the same pronouns.
      Content: 3/3
      I felt you really connected the article to the novel and showed how the pieces intertwine with each other. This piece really made me think of it in a different way and intellectually made me think.
      From: Hannah Tarbell

      Delete
  38. Josephine Aina
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11, Period 5
    30 September 2015

    Dialectical Journal: "Fahrenheit 451 and On Face Work""

    Many textual evidence occurs in the pieces of literature, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray
    Bradbury and On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction by Erving Goffman that connect the readings with having a common theme. Goffman's text, states that the reasoning behind an individual's actions are not in hopes of establishing good will, but instead,
    of complying with the informal sanctions society has set for its people to follow. Goffman then explains that in the circumstances that a person does not abide to the given social norms, that person will then advance towards "saving face" or maintaining the respect of others while avoiding minimal humiliation. Goffman also implies that in order for someone to "save face" that person will turn to lying either consciously or subconsciously in order to stay in the good graces of society or whomever. The theory of Goffman's analysis pertaining towards lying to stay in good graces and following the rules of society or "common sense" is of important relevance when comparing and connecting the reoccurring theme in Fahrenheit 451. For example, "How rarely did other people's faces take of you…” (11), Bradbury introduces the possibility that faces people wear while interacting vary by the emotion or feeling you display and is reciprocated by the other person. Another example from Fahrenheit 451 that helps Goffman's theory of "saving face", would be "He wore his happiness like a mask…” (12) the excerpt implies that Montag's emotions, in this case his happiness, are held within a cover, hence the mask, and is easily able to be taken away or metaphorically speaking, taken off. Goffman and Bradbury's pieces of literature have an abundant amount of textual evidence that help to relate the texts, mainly by the shared theme of wearing a mask in order to save face.

    Word Count: 300

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    1. Form: 2
      Great grammar, flow, and clarity.
      Content: 3
      Great textual evidence given. Good job on explaining each example. However, try to include more examples from the text.
      Phenomenal!

      Delete

  39. Megan Farrell
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, P. 5
    24 September 2015

    Dialectical Journal #2

    Erving Goffman’s idea of Dramaturgy, specifically the drive for humans to attempt to preserve the “faces” (Goffman 7) of others during conversation, is exemplified well in Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451. A prime example of this crossover can be observed when Montag desperately insists, “I am, very much in love!” (Bradbury 22), as he vehemently denies the implication that his love for his wife is false, Clarisse steps in to help him “save his face”. In order to alleviate the sudden tension of the conversation due to Montag’s loss of “face”, Clarisse says “Of course that must be it. Oh, now I’ve upset you, I can see I have; I’m sorry, really I am.’ (Bradbury 22). This quick apology made to cover Montag’s social mistake fits with the dramaturgical ideas such as, “The combined effect of the rule of self-respect and the rule of considerateness is that the person tends to conduct himself during an encounter so as to maintain both his own face and the face of the other participants.” (Goffman 7). In this situation, both Montag and Clarisse were conscious of the image that they were presenting to the other and were in turn affected by the subconscious desire to prevent damage to the “face” of the one they were interacting with. Clarisse and Montag’s interaction showcases the ideas that Goffman writes about in “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction”, and the use of these elements helps to make the characters more tangible to the reader.

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    1. Form: 2
      - Issues with wording cause error in flow which damages the overall clarity. Good use of ''dollar" words.
      Content: 2
      - The support for the thesis is well done.
      Comments: Great use of words, I haven't heard vehemently used in quite some time. The ending, if done differently, could better define and support your thesis.

      Delete
  40. Dialectical Journal 2
    Throughout the beginning of Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, the character Guy Montag gradually begins to “lose face”, described by Erving Goffman in “An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” to mean “to be in wrong face, to be out of face, or to be shamefaced” (7 Goffman). The term “face” is defined as “the positive social value a person effectively claims himself by the line (pattern of verbal and nonverbal acts by which someone expresses their views) others assume he has taken during a particular contact” (7 Goffman). Initially, Guy Montag is presented a respectable, obedient working-man in the society he lives in. He follows the rules, although he initially doesn’t think much of the meanings or origins behind them. After meeting Clarisse, he begins to think about his lifestyle and society. His thoughts, personality, views, beliefs, are all challenged, he even once miserably states, “I don’t now anything any more” (18 Bradbury). He begins to lose his face, and this becomes especially evident in observing his actions. The Mechanical Hound, which can sense when someone is having thoughts/feelings contrary to popular belief, growls at Montag every time he’s at work. He also begins asking questions, such as “… About the man whose library we fixed. What happened to him?” or “Was – was it always like this? The firehouse, our work?” (33-34 Bradbury). Bradbury applied Goffman’s theory of “loss of face” to the character Guy Montag to help build his character and move the plot forward.

    Word Count: 296

    Jaylin Hendricks

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    1. Form: You used good evidence to flow with your points in the essay. 3/3
      Content:You did a good job effectively pulling together Goffman's Theory into Montag losing face and how his face progresses with being with clarisse and what he starts to realize about the world he lives in. 3/3

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  41. Giavonna Bethea
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H Period 5
    01 October 2015
    Reader Response Journal: “Bradbury vs Goffman”
    Montag in Bradbury’s _Fahrenheit 451_ provides numerous examples of Goffman’s social science on face work. When Clarisse comes into Montag’s life she makes him question his every day firemen’s “script” (Lecture notes) by saying, "So many people are. Afraid of firemen, I mean. But you're just a man, after all,” (Bradbury 7) she points out the fact that he is very different from the other firemen she has met in her life. This kick starts Montag to start to question his job and his life which leads to his awkward encounter at the fire station with his fellow colleagues, where in the following quote he so desperately tries to save his face, “Fool, thought Montag to himself, you'll give it away. At the last fire, a book of fairy tales, he'd glanced at a single line. "I mean," he said, "in the old days, before homes were completely fireproofed…(Bradbury 34)" In Goffman’s article he states, “Whether or not the full consequences of face-saving actions are known to the person who employs them, they often come habitual and standardized practices (8),” which explains why Montag was so quick to lie in order to save his face.
    Word Count: 192

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    1. Form: You have nice word choice and the evidence moves smoothly with the paper. 2/3
      Content: Your thesis is backed up by adequate evidence. 3/3

      Delete
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  43. Hannelore Trama
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, per. 5
    1 October 2015
    The Conflict Between Montag and His Many Faces
    In the novel titled _Fahrenheit 451_ and the article _On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction_, both Bradbury and Goffman are asserting that one can have multiple personalities. Bradbury develops this claim by using Goffman’s “save face” (9) on Montag when he states rather defensively “I am, very much in love!” (Bradbury 20), after Clarisse puts the dandelion under his chin. This theory goes `along with what Goffman has written about in his article of “save face” where “once he takes on a self-image expressed through face he will be expected to live up to it” (7) in which case Montag is putting up another face as to not lose the way he is perceived. However, Goffman states that “often the person does not have the clear idea of what would be a just or acceptable apportionment of judgments during the occasion, and so he voluntarily deprives or depreciates himself while indulging and complimenting the others…” (10) which just so happens to be what Montag is doing when he sobs after thinking of what has happened in such little amount of time, “all rushing on down around in a spouting roar and rivering stream toward morning” (Bradbury 15). Goffman and Bradbury have parallels between their article and novel of how one must always have on a face in order to hide or defend who they are.

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    Replies
    1. Form: Good restatement of thesis at the end and good transitions. Make sure MLA formatting is correct. 2/3
      Content: Very good content. Essay really shows that useful ways Bradbury utilizes Goffman's social science theories. Good use of examples from both texts. 3/3

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  44. Dialectical Journal #2 Goffman Montag Comparison
    Goffman’s theory of “face-work” appears multiple times throughout _Fahrenheit 451_, Guy Montag, specifically, uses “face-work” frequently to cover his inner personality. Montag is constantly around those who think very differently from him. He thinks outside the box, challenging what is accepted, unlike his co-working fireman, who are inside the box; following the guidelines and rules provided. Guy Montag happens “to lose face” (Goffman 7) when he says, “Didn’t fireman prevent fires?” (Bradbury 34) referring to Goffman’s article, this is Guy breaking face and showing his true self for a split moment. He quickly regrets this, and like Goffman’s theory of a person after losing face, he became very embarrassed (Goffman 8) and quiet. His fellow fireman reacted by pointing out his embarrassment and staring at him awkwardly, causing the situation to become worse. This would be considered the inappropriate action by Goffman, the fireman should have helped him return his face rather than influence it. Goffman mentions a similar action involving social etiquette when applied to his “face-work” theory on page ten. Montag’s fellow fireman acted this way most likely because they are not often presented with someone breaking face in their dystopian society. Montag poses as a prime example of Goffman’s concept of “face-work”.

    ReplyDelete
  45. Annie David
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, P.5
    26 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal
    Fahrenheit 451 focuses partly on society and the customary actions of people within it. Everyone does certain actions to maintain face, according to Erving Goffman in his article on face- work. In order for people to know which face to maintain they utilize a “pattern of verbal and nonverbal acts by which he expresses his view of the situation and through this, his evaluation of participants,” (Goffman, 3) called a line. Montag notices Clarisse ‘stepping out of line’ early in the novel. He disputes her actions by saying, “You laugh when I haven’t been funny and you answer right off. You never stop to think what I’ve asked you,” (Bradbury, 8). Clarisse isn’t preserving the ‘line’ Montag, and society for that matter, want her to. Montag becomes defensive on how Clarisse acts because he isn’t accommodated to the critical thinking that Clarisse is performing. Clarisse is only considered ‘stepping out of line’ because her actions don’t sustain the ideals of the social norms of that society. Another ironic notion is that Montag says that Clarisse doesn’t stop to think when in reality Clarisse thinks much more than those around her. Ray Bradbury’s society of Fahrenheit 451 seems to be following a few of the ideals of the present society.
    Word Count: 222

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  46. David M. Bachman
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H, period 5
    30 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal

    Ray Bradbury often depicts characters in Fahrenheit 451 attempting to do what Goffman calls “Saving Face.” Goffman defines “Saving Face” as attempting to prevent losing face, or becoming embarrassed, by any means possible. For example, “I am very much in love!’ He tried to conjure up a face to fit the words, but there was no face.” (Bradbury 22) Montag didn’t want to lose face in front of Clarisse McClellan. People are even willing to lie to others and themselves to prevent losing face. Montag has convinced himself that he is in love with Mildred yet he just now begins to realize that he is far from being in love. This revelation is one of many catalysts Montag experiences that causes him to rethink his life and the society in which he belongs. This section of the novel can also be seen as a question being asked to reader. Is there anything in the reader’s life that he or she has convinced himself or herself will hold a positive outcome or lead to their happiness but in reality is frankly the opposite of what they truly desire?

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    1. Form: 3/3 You had correct grammar and spelling throughout your response.
      Content: 3/3 You opened up a new view for me for the event that you wrote about, I never thought about it like that.

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  47. Arika Garcia
    Ms. Bugni
    English 11 Honors, p.5
    27 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal #2
    Ray Bradbury characters, Mildred and Montag, in Fahrenheit 451, “save face” (Goffman 7) when interacting with one another, and try not to destroy their image that they have created with one another. The term “save face” comes from Erving Goffman, which can be inferred to mean that a person’s way of acting in a public setting or a person’s certain way of interacting with other people socially creates an image for everyone. Mildred’s and Montag’s interactions are very dull and usually Montag leaves her at the house or goes to sleep with his wife and they never end up having a meaningful conversation with eachother. For example, “‘It’s sure fun,’ she said. ‘What’s the play about?’ ‘I just told you. There are these people named Bob and Ruth and Helen.’ ‘Oh.’”(Bradbury 20), this conversation between Montag and Mildred is about the script Mildred reads from and according to Goffman’s term save face, the face that Montag is showing to Mildred is him staying interested in her by trying converse with her while not trying to have deep conversations that would make her question him. While Mildred is trying to “save face” (Goffman) with Montag by acknowledging Montag’s existence but not interact with him a lot, even though neither Mildred nor Montag show affection to each other. The significance of “saving face” (Goffman) is colossal, because according to Goffman, “Once he takes on a self-image expressed through face he will be expected to live up to it,” (Goffman 7) so Montag and Mildred have to be who they have shown each other and save face or they risk destroying the images they have cultivated for the last ten years of marriage.
    [word count:294]

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  50. Ezr-Tiahna Divina
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H
    October 1, 2015
    Reader’s Response Journal #2 Revised
    Ray Bradbury’s _Fahrenheit 451_ and Erving Goffman’s “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” closely tie together through the character of Guy Montag of _Fahrenheit 451_. Goffman’s significant main idea of his article is the use of faces in society gives us a better understanding of Montag’s dynamic character, specifically, with the use of “saving face” we get to know Montag with the characteristic of care. Throughout pages three to twenty-four, Montag is mostly shown to save face, in other words, “[the] process by the person [Montag] sustains an impression face,” (Goffman, 7). However, Montag is also shown to save other’s faces using the method of face-work, such as of Mildred and Clarisse, which portrays his caring side. A significant example of Montag’s care is illustrated on page 29; Clarisse calls herself a fool for assuming Montag’s thoughts however he uses face-work through reassurance, telling her, “No, no…it was a good question. It’s been a long time since anyone cared enough to ask,” (Bradbury, 29). Montag could easily let Clarisse lose her face by making her feel foolish however he reassures her that it was a good question and to not feel guilty of what she had said. Although there are a handful of examples of Montag’s use of face-work, this was one prime example. Montag is different from everyone else as Clarisse had suspected and is slowly unveiling the truth of himself just through Goffman’s theory of faces.
    Word Count: 242

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  51. Percy Andres Trujillo Gastelo
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H, period 5
    24 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal
    Erving Goffman, a professor of sociology in the University of Pennsylvania, confirms that a “person will have two points of view—a defensive orientation toward saving his own face and a protective orientation toward saving the others’ face. Some practices will be primarily defensive and others primarily protective, although in general one may expect these two perspectives to be taken at the same time.” (Goffman 9) This belief can be compared to the novel Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury. The main character, Guy Montag, has changed his way of viewing the world due to a character named Clarisse. Clarisse made Montag think so differently that he started questioning his own beliefs, such as if firemen had always burned books and houses. Usually Montag went out for walks, and Clarisse would join in; in one of their walks, Clarisse tells Montag that if he rubbed a dandelion against his chin, if his chin shined, then he was in love. However, his chin didn’t shine because, according to the game, he was not in “love”. Montag got very defensive and said, “I am. Very much in love! I am!” (Bradbury 22). Based on the quote from Goffman, Montag is trying to defend himself or to “save face” in order to not look embarrassed in front of Clarisse.
    Word Count: 234

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    1. Form: Remember to put the period after the (Goffman 9). like this. Also watch for run-on sentences. 2
      Content: The connections between the book and the article are pretty well done. 2

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  52. Reader Response
    Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 includes evidence that supports Erving Goffman’s On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction paper that states a theory of everyone “saving face” (Goffman 7). In the article Goffman says, “…face may be defined as the positive social value a person effectively claims for himself by the line others assume he has taken during a particular contact.” (Goffman 7) Goffman’s face theory is seen in Fahrenheit 451’s Guy Montag seems to have different ways of speaking when in the presence of different characters. With Clarisse Guy is livelier and asks more questions, but when he is with his wife Guy is bored and a tad bit annoyed. “It was a good question. It’s been a long time since anyone cared enough to ask. A good question.”(Bradbury 30) In this scene Guy is thrown back that this girl asked him a question about his personal life, this shows the type of society they live in and the way the two talk differently when around each other compared to others.

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    1. Form: 2/3 Your story has nice grammar but maybe evaluate your comma use after quotes and between character names.

      Content: 2/3 You used nice word choice and it was a decent analysis of the character interactions.

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  54. Zay Sinclair
    English 11 H, period 6
    Mrs. Bugni
    26 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal # 2
    Ray Bradbury uses Erving Goffman’s theory that humans have and utilize their ”lose and save face” throughout his characters in his novel “Fahrenheit 451”, Guy Montag, Clarisse McClellan, and Mildred Montag show the characteristics that this theory outlines. Throughout Goffman’s article titled On Face-Work: “An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” Goffman summarizes his theory that humans can’t always keep the wall that they build up in front of a certain person or context as stated by Goffman ” The term face may be defined as the positive social value a person effectively claims for himself by the line others assume he has taken during a particular contact”(pg.7), and Bradbury employs this through Guy Montag when he encounters Clarisse McClellan for the first time . Montag seems to lose face around Clarisse usually he retains that look and act as fireman of their time often have, Clarisse appears to make Montag think freely something he hasn’t done………….. Ever and Mildred causes something to stir in him as well “one drop of rain. Clarisse. Another drop. Mildred. A third. The uncle. A forth the fire tonight……..” ( pg. 17); Montag has held in all the pain and has shouldered all the burden in his life in the past few days, Ray Bradbury incorporates Goffman’s theory that Montag is “ losing face” with all that has occurred he no longer has the strength to hold up that blockade. During a class discussion we observed a common point that there seems to be a lot of struggling and strife in his life and that when he is not being a senseless drone destroying books without even a second thought but with Clarisse in Montag’s head he can’t resist the allure that his surroundings are bequeathing unto him.

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    1. Form: You have an excellent form. The level of description that you use helps retain my attention when reading. On lines 12-14 you state "... he retains that look and act as firemen of their time often have...". This should be revised due to a majoe sentence error. 2/3
      Content: You had a really good grasp of the content and was able to easily help me understand the view on which you took the content. I would add more detail and a more in-depth analysis of how you tied Bradbury's and Goffman's work together. 3/3

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  55. Reader Response Journal Goffman and Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451, Montag is shown to have a protective orientation when dealing with Mildred. This incident happens when the next morning after the pill overdose incident. Mildred woke up feeling super hungry. When Mildred asked if she did not sleep well Montag replied with, “Don’t you remember?”(Bradbury 19) Mildred then replied with, “What? Did we have a wild party or something? Feel like I’ve a hangover. God, I’m hungry. Who was here?”(Bradbury 19), Montag then saves Mildred’s face by saying, “A few people,” (Bradbury 19). In Goffman’s article, he states, “It seems to be a characteristic obligation of many social relationships that each members guarantees to support a given face for the other members in given situations.” (Goffman 12). In this case, Montag is supporting the face as a husband but not as a person, making sure not to hurt Mildred’s feelings. However, a time that he supports his face as a husband and as a person is when he talks to Mildred about the empty pill bottle. Montag tells Mildred, “Maybe you took two pills and forgot and took two more, and forgot again and took two more, and were so dopey you kept right on until you had thirty or forty of them in you.”(Bradbury 19), Mildred then responded with, “Heck, what would I want to go do a silly thing like that for?”(Bradbury 19), saving Mildred’s face Montag responded with, “I don’t know.”(Bradbury 19) Throughout the book Montag protects Mildred’s face over his own.

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    1. Form: great thesis shows great intellectual potential 3/3

      Content: The content is well written and gives the reader a lot of information to back up your claim 3/3

      Comment: Outstanding job Hunter

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    2. form 3/3 the flow of the passage was great
      content 2/3 the way you used the quotations well

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  57. Ilyana Raymond
    Bugni
    English 11
    29 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal #2
    I believe that Montag is the character who makes attempts to preserve his own face and the faces of others the most. Preservation of one’s face, as defined by Erving Goffman, is “the process by which [a] person sustains an impression for others that he has not lost face” (Goffman 7). One instance of Montag trying to help another save face is the morning after Mildred’s overdose. He initially says to her, “‘You took all the pills in your bottle last night,’” but after her repeated rejections of this statement, he concedes an “‘All right if you say so’” (Bradbury 17). Later, upon Clarisse McLellan claiming that she’d hurt his feelings he swiftly dismisses her, “‘No no,’ he said, quickly, ‘I’m all right’” (Bradbury 20). Montag then attempts to help Clarisse save face, when pressed for an apology, “‘Yes, I have. God knows why. You’re peculiar, you’re aggravating, yet you’re easy to forgive’” (Bradbury 21). He knows she will not take offense from his negative statements due to their relationship, making it apparent that he is genuinely trying to help her save face. There are many instances in which Montag tries to save his own and the face of others.
    Words: 200

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    1. Form: 3/3 Your grammar usage is executed very well and the whole passage sounds smooth and proper.

      Content: 3/3 Your examples were followed up by detailed explanations and i was able to completely understand the point you were trying to get across.

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  58. Tania Melero
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, Period 6
    1 October 2015
    Dialect Journal #2
    The Goffman article uses losing face to be described as “to be shamefaced” which relates to Montag from Fahrenheit 451. “To lose face seems to be in wrong face, to be out of face” (7). Montag is an authoritative character considering he’s a fireman. Since he’s met Clarisse he has began “to lose face.” He’s starting to let out his true feelings and has moments where his authority is put down. “The whole world pouring down. The fire gushing up in a volcano. All rushing on down around in a spouting roar and roaring stream toward morning” (18). This shows when Montag was crying. He lost face because he wasn’t an emotionless fireman at the time. All of his feelings overwhelmed him and he realized he wasn’t happy. Montag has put up a face making it seem like he does not care about Clarisse, but once he stopped seeing her he missed her. “While at first he did not even know he missed her or was even looking for her, the fact was that by the time he reached the subway, there was vague stirring of dis-ease in him” (32). He lost face by actually realizing he missed her. Overall, Montag is losing face the more he’s discovering how he truly feels instead of constantly keeping up the face of a fireman.

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    1. Form: I found the quotes you chose to be very fitting. And while your quotes excelled, it was hard to ignore the fact that you did not properly cite them. 2/3
      Content: I find the core concept you chose to be very fascinating. I am excited to see where Montag’s loss of face will lead him in the future. However, I feel as though your journal could have benefitted from having the thesis properly stated at the beginning. It might have shed some initial clarity on the content to follow. 2/3

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    2. Forum: 3/3 The point of your essay is well expressed through your examples and quotes.

      Content: 3/3 You explained how your quotes went with your thesis, overall your essay went together.

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  59. Sabrina Baker
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, Period 6
    30 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal: Fahrenheit 451
    In the novel Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury’s work can be compared to Erving Goffman’s article On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction. Goffman mentions the phrase “to save one’s face” (7 Goffman) and how it means to preserve and maintain your image. Goffman states that you are only ever truly and completely yourself when you are alone. I believe this represents Montag in a massive way. The first time his facade of being a tough fireman has a hole poked into it is when Clarisse asks him “are you happy,” (10 Bradbury) and he rebuttaled with “Happy! Of all the nonsense” (10 Bradbury). He brushes off what she had said as if it was ludicrous and absurd to even ask, but when he was alone, his mask fell and he started questioning what really was becoming of his life. The other example of Montag’s face is when he muttered to himself “I don’t know anymore,” (18 Bradbury). He says this after he starts crying and having an emotional break down from not really knowing what purpose he has. Crying isn’t exactly the typical response the average fireman would have, not the average thoughts. Montag feels helpless but constantly tries to save face by masking his true emotions around others.

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    1. Form: For the citations I believe it is suppose to be (Goffman 7) instead of (7 Goffman). Other than that the form and grammar are perfect. 2/3
      Context: This response was unique and interesting to read. Great word choices. 3/3

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    2. Form: 3/3 Grammar is good and the vocabulary is strong. The syntax makes the passage flow smoothly while reading.

      Content: 3/3 Throughout the passage, the author does a fine job at connecting Goffman's views on social interactions with the novel. The evidence also has relevance to the main theme.

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    3. form 3/3 the journal flowed well
      content 2/3 the author does a great job connecting the two articles

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  61. Lane Finley
    Mrs. Bugni
    24 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal #2
    Life is a play. "Each person, subculture and society seems to have its own characteristic repertoire of face saving practices,"(Goffman, 7). Goffman goes on to talk about how everyone follows a script. We spend our lives playing roles for an audience. All the interactions we have with one another we're wearing a certain 'face' or 'mask' to portray ourselves in a particular way. The only exception is when we are alone, and there is no audience to perform for. That is when we are our true selves. Bradbury displays the same dramaturgy in Fahreinheit 451. It isn't until Clarisse encounters Montag that he realizes what it was like to 'lose face'. To everyone Montag plays the stolid script of firefighter, and with Clarisse he takes on the script of observer and friend. He has never played either of these scripts before. "He wore his happiness like a mask and the girl had ran off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back,"(Bradbury, 12). Montag's face of authority has been tarnished by Clarisse, so to recover he compensates his firefighter mask for his friend mask.
    Word count: 200

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    1. I like how you talked about the 'faces' and 'masks' we wear. Also good job on drawing so many connections between Goffman's essay and the novel.

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  63. Emily Strasser
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H, Period 6
    24 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal: Fahrenheit 451 #2
    In Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, and Erving Goffman’s On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction, both authors use the reference of a mask and a face interchangeably to show how society has a different script for the role they are playing at that time. According to Goffman’s article, a face is defined as, “the positive social value a person effectively claims to himself by the line others assume he has taken during a particular contact,” (7). Bradbury has a similar quote that describes this, but referring to the mask. He states, “He wore his happiness like a mask and the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back,” (12). Altogether, these excerpts show that the social norm is to have a different script for each role they play. For example, In Fahrenheit 451, Guy Montag will never go to Clarisse’s door and ask for his “mask” back because he doesn’t want to show her that she was right; he want to keep the script of the fireman. Personally, when I perform in Show Choir, my director drills in the choirs brains’, “fake it until you make it.” If we don’t put on our performing mask, being happy and cheerful, then we will look like we aren’t having fun. Also, we wouldn’t make the connection with the audience, and then they will be bored. All around, your face and your mask are a part of society and everyday lives.
    Word Count: 265

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  64. Kanittha Thanangamsuwan
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11, P. 6
    24 September, 2015
    Reader Response Journal: “Fahrenheit 451” Week 2
    Fahrenheit 451 has taken a deeper turn into Montag’s society, where codes are followed routinely, rules regulate to the T, and roles fulfillments are taken to the next level. Following his encounter with Clarisse, Montag has never realized that his life was a routine code of conduct. So much so that he didn’t realize until she was gone, “And then, Clarisse was gone. He didn’t know what there was about the afternoon… his routine had been disturbed. A simple routine … He almost turned back to makes the walk again, to give her time to appear.” (32). Montag has yet to become aware of how the role he plays was already predetermined the moment be decided to take up the role of a firemen. “ Rule: 1.) Answer the alarm swiftly, 2.) Start a fire swiftly, 3.) Burn everything, 4.) Report back to the firehouse immediately, and 5.) Stand alert for other alarms.” (35). His role is to be a firemen who waits, burns, and waits again. It is a never ending cycle, but because of Clarisse, Montag’s cycle was broken and he was introduced to a new state of acceptance. “A state … temporarily accepts everyone else’s line…” (Goffman, 1). Ray Bradbury has been trying to point out the oppressive future our society may face if we allow something as code and rules to regulate and run our life. That our roles is something we should be able to choose instead of being assets.
    Word Count: 242

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    1. Form: I really like how your writing is written in a friendly style. I would recommend adding more structure to giving a statement, example, and explaining the example. 2/3
      Content: I liked the insight of Montag never realizing that his life is a routine code of conduct. However, I would recommend adding a few more examples to strengthen your argument. 2/3

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  65. To Save Face or to Lose it
    Ray Bradbury’s novel Fahrenheit 451 closely relates to Erving Goffman’s Analysis of Ritual Social Interaction in many ways, but namely on the study of “Saving” and “Losing” face. In Goffman’s excerpt he states that “In our Anglo-American society, as in some others, the phrase “to lose face” seems to mean to be in the wrong face, to be out of face, or to be shamefaced.” (7) This seems to apply to Montag as he begins to change as the novel progresses; we get to see him start to realize the little things in the world around him and begin to learn from Clarisse. Clarisse, in this capacity, is like the old man from the book The Giver Montag is Jonah, whom she helps process the real world in a different way thus allowing him to truly live. We also see the concept Goffman refers to as “face work,” which Goffman goes on to explain as “When face has been threatened, face-work must be done, but whether this is initiated and primarily carried through by the person whose face is threatened.” (9) In the novel
    Montag’s face or “mask” of being the good fireman is under attack when Clarisse first starts to question Monatg and his career. As the novel progresses though, we begin to see a change in Monatg and, in turn, a change in the masks that he wears in his different roles throughout the day. Now we can see, as the novel evolves, how Goffman’s analysis and Montag’s experiences are interlinked and relevant to one another.

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  66. Dialectical Journal: Fahrenheit 451
    In Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, Clarisse keeps face by playing the part of the stigma that society has placed on her in order to avoid drawing attention to herself. As Bradbury writes, "I've got to see my psychiatrist now. They make me go. I make up things to say. I don't know what he thinks of me. He says I'm a regular onion! I keep him busy peeling away the layers" (22). Bradbury informs the reader that Clarisse is forced to go to her psychiatric visits and in order to keep everyone at bay she makes up things to say. This directly correlates to Erving Goffman's theory on keeping face and withing that, following lines. As stated in Goffman's Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction, "The combined effect of the rule of self-respect and the rule of considerateness is that the person tends to conduct himself during an encounter so as to maintain both his own face and the face of the other participants" (Par. 4). As explained in Goffman's theory, Clarisse is keeping the face that society has put on her; she plays the face of being insane. Clarisse does this in order to save face and not draw any extra attention to her, less something terrible befalls her.

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    1. You used proper grammar throughout the whole journal, and excellent use of siting! Your journal was very interesting to read and kept me interested the whole way through. Great Job! 3/3!

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  67. Tanner Stevens
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, P. 6
    1 October 2015
    Reader Response
    Ray Bradbury takes the theory of Erving Goffman presented in his article "On Face-Work" and challenges it with his two characters Montag and Clarisse. There are two points of view within this theory; the defending of ones own face and the protectiveness of saving someone else's face. Guy Montag comes from a social background of a very secluded lifestyle. Having a daily routine where he reacts with two or three people at most where the interactions are never intellectual. Clarisse comes from a very open and curios minded social lifestyle. She constantly is hearing and participating in intellectual conversations about many new and abstract ideas. When the two come in contact, Montag keeps a very defensive attitude in keeping his face. "You are an odd one" (Bradbury 8) he says to protect his image. Clarisse on the other hand is constantly leaving herself vulnerable with curious questions and remarks that lead away from the norm of their overall society. She gains face through doing so as well as almost loosing it by being so abstract. Bradbury creates this clash between two different saving face viewpoints in a way of supporting Goffman's theory and gives an example of the theory in action. But with this expresses how each individual past can affect which safe face technique one takes on.

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    1. Great use of detail and examples. Your journal kept me interested through its entirety. The way you explained and combined the two works helped me understand the main idea much clearer. 3/3!

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  68. Kaitlin Farrell
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 Honors, Period 6
    27 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal 2
    In Bradbury’s novel, Fahrenheit 451, Montag loses face in many occasions. As in face I mean, “The positive social value a person effectively claims for himself by the line others assume he has taken during a particular contact,” (Goffman 7). In many instances, Montag loses face. He wants to be perceived and respected as the authority figure of the fireman; however Clarisse does and says many things to make him lose face. As Clarisse and Montag walk along, Clarisse asks Montag series of questions that possibly make him lose face. One example is when Clarisse asks, “Is it true that long ago firemen put fires out instead of going to start them?” (Bradbury 8) Montag responds quickly and laughs at her and what she asks him. Clarisse replies, “You laugh when I haven’t been funny and you answer right off. You never stopped think what I’ve asked you” (Bradbury 8). Montag’s laugh and quick answer is a quick reaction to maintain face, and hide how uncomfortable he is with her asking these questions because they question his status of authority. As their walk comes to an end and they are departing, Clarisse asks one last question, “Are you happy?” (Bradbury 10) At first, Montag was trying to save face by trying to convince himself he is happy, but he later admits he truly is not happy. “He wore his happiness as a mask and the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back” (Bradbury 12). When they departed, Clarisse took his “mask” and she left him with that brain probing question which caused him to lose face. Trying to maintain his script of the authoritative fireman, Montag wants to go gain face back, but by asking for it back shows he lost face making him lose face even more. Goffman’s theory of losing and gaining face is prominent in Fahrenheit 451. Montag can’t seem to gain face, but he has to lose some to gain some.

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    1. Form: you have a lot great examples that allow the piece to flow easily. 3/3
      Content: There are a lot of examples that support your topic sentence and I enjoy your theme of Montag losing face. 3/3

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  69. Jacob Nardone
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H P.6
    24 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal #2
    Analyzing Social Interactions in Fahrenheit 451

    As Erving Goffman explained in his paper titled “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction”, the basic foundation of social interaction revolves around the acquisition, protection, and donation of “face”, and that when in the presence of one or more persons, everyone will follow a “social script” to generate or sustain dignity and keep the participants at ease. This idea can be observed in everyday communication, no matter what personal connection is had between the people involved. In Fahrenheit 451, Goffman's view on social interaction is presented within the dialogue. For example, when Clarisse asks Montag, "Are you happy," (10) and Montag replies by saying, "Happy? Of all the nonsense." (10) Here, Montag follows the social guidelines that are present when speaking with a stranger, and he avoided the inappropriate upbringing of his marital issues and depression with someone he has just met. Another example in the novel is when Mildred is talking about a play she will be attending using her TV, and Montag asks her what it's about. After she says that it's about "people named Bob and Ruth and Helen" (20), Montag responds simply with "Oh" (20), which shows that he is refraining from expressing his real feelings. Instead of confronting Mildred about the fact that the play is pointless, he keeps his thoughts to himself and bypasses a possible argument with his wife. In Fahrenheit 451 and in the real world, saving yourself and others from an unpleasant experience during a social interaction is commonly seen in all dialogues.

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    1. Form: You used proper punctuation and very detailed, intellectual, words, making the passage written appear very professional and educated. Be sure to include author's last name in citations. 3/3

      Content: Your journal truly makes the reader rethink the chapters that have been read. You also related the two articles very smoothly and it was a pleasant, well written, and entertaining read. 3/3

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  70. Chloe Glantz
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H period 6
    29 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal
    The novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and the article "On Face Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction" by Erving Goffman both indicate the theory that one will maintain their script as an individual to "save face", (Goffman) or maintain social standards among others in society. Fahrenheit 451 demonstrates this theory when Montag's routine is disrupted when Clarisse disappears. "Something was the matter, his routine had been disturbed." (32) Montag wants to save face by keeping his usual "script" in walking home with Clarisse. Montag is then caused to keep face in front of his coworkers although he is clearly distracted and troubled. "Beatty was looking at him as if he were a museum statue. At any moment, Beatty might rise and walk about him, touching, exploring his guilt and self-consciousness." (33) This theory of "saving face" applies to every individual. We all have a role to play in our lives, and others expect us to maintain it.

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    1. Form: You have a great form, you use a lot of description yet you are concise. Maybe try elaborating a little more on your ideas. 3/3
      Content: You have a unique and different view on the content compared to your peers. Next time try adding in a direct quote from Goffman to add another level of depth and understanding.

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    2. Form: Your journal was very clear and understandable. There doesn't seem to be any grammatical or syntax errors. 3/3

      Content: I enjoyed the your outlook on the topic and the theme you chose. Your final sentence is very dramatic and a great closure to the topic. 3/3

      Delete
  71. Orion Sinacori
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H, Period 6
    30 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal 2
    The novel, “Fahrenheit 451,” relates to Erving Goffman’s “On Face-Work” through the interaction of characters. Clarisse is nearly the perfect match to Goffman’s article since she saves others’ faces along with other aspects of Goffman’s article. Saving one’s face “appears to refer to the process by which the person sustains an impression for others that he has not lost face” (7, Goffman). This was shown through Montag being baffled after the first appearance of Clarisse, “Impossible; for how many people did you know who refracted your own light to you” (11, Bradbury), Clarisse made eye contact and other facial expressions to match what Montag was saying; she was saving his face by seeming interested in what he had to say. Later in the novel, Clarisse goes on to speak with Montag about her psychiatrist, “‘I’m inclined to believe you need the psychiatrist,’ said Montag.” in that moment Clarisse had lost face which is to be “in wrong face, to be out of face, or to be shamefaced” (7, Goffman); then she displayed “a defensive orientation toward saving his own face” (9, Goffman) by saying “you don’t mean that” (22, Bradbury). Now, Clarisse is not the only one who follows Goffman’s rules, in fact, all of the characters follow his rules. Montag, for example, saves Clarisse’s face by saying, “‘No, I don’t mean that’” (23, Bradbury), Montag obviously meant what he said but in order to save her face he took back what he said about her needing a psychiatrist. Even though Clarisse expresses a very unique persona for the time period, she is still the same, as Goffman proclaims “underneath their differences in culture, people everywhere are the same” (13, Goffman). In conclusion, Clarisse is a strong representation of Goffman’s article; although, everyone is a part of his claim.

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  72. Jazmin Aguilar
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, Period 6
    1 October 2015
    Reader Response Journal
    In Ray Bradbury's novel, "Fahrenheit 451," Bradbury writes about how Montag uses save face and lose face the same way Erving Goffman's article, "On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction" describes the process. For example when Goffman says ,"Once he takes the self-image expressed through face he will be expected to live up to it (7)." This is exactly what Montag has done because he is only recognized as a firefighter to everyone. Montag decides to talk about old firefighters and how he thought "firemen prevented fires rather than stoke them up," while talking to Beatty and starts to lose face, but then he realizes so he saves his face, "Everyone watched Montag. He did not move (35)." Clarisse and Montag have an interesting relationship which can be described as father and daughter, but she knows how to push his buttons by asking him a bunch of questions and making him question things he never thought about, but he saves his face before he hits his breaking point, "You'd better run on to your appointment, (24)." He saves his face by asking Clarisse to leave before he starts to have a break down.

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    1. Form: Your form is excellent. 3/3
      Content: The response was interesting and enjoyable to read. 3/3

      Delete
    2. Form score- 2
      You have great quotes but you forgot to put put the page number at the end of the quote which stated “firemen prevented fires rather than stoke them up,”.
      Content score- 2
      You had great evidence which connected to your thesis but you should put your evidence and quote in logical page order.

      Delete
  73. Heavyn Lopez
    English 11, Period 6
    18 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal: “Fahrenheit 451”
    In Goffmans article he talks about losing and saving face and the concept of losing and saving face is shown in “Fahrenheit 451” through the protagonist Montag. According to Goffmans article “In our Anglo-American society, as in some others, the phrase “to lose face” seems to mean to be in wrong face, to be out of face, or to be shamefaced. The phrase “to save one’s face” appears to refer to the process by which the person sustains an impression for others that he has not lost face”(1). In “Fahrenheit 451” Montag tries to not lose his face by using laughter. For example Clarisse says, “You laugh when I haven’t been funny and you answer right off. You never stop to think what I’ve asked you”(8). As you can see in this quote Montag just tries to hurry up and answer her questions and then laugh about it so that he dosen’t lose face. In Goffmans article he states “the person will have two points of view-a defensive orientation toward saving his own face”(3), which Montag had just had “and a protective orientation toward saving the others’ face”(3). Montag has this protective orientation toward saving the face of Clarisse. For example he declares, “ “It’s the dandelion”, he said. “You’ve used it all up on yourself. That’s why it won’t work for me.” ”(22). Montag said this to save Clarisse’s face from being disappointed. Also earlier in “Fahrenheit 451” it shows how Clarisse isn’t like Montag toward saving the faces of others’. She want’s to see the real Montag and his real personality and to see this she asked Montag if he is happy. By Clarisse asking this question Montag loses face. “He wore his happiness like a mask and the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back”(12).
    Word Count: 317

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    1. I feel like you connected the idea of face work into Fahrenheit 451 very exceptionally. I really understood how these pieces correlated with each other in a more intellectual manner.

      -Cameron Farella

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  74. Dialectical Journal Number Two
    In the novel Fahrenheit 451, Clarisse supports Goffman’s statement regarding “saving face” and “losing face” (Goffman 7). For example, Clarisse tries to save face at her psychiatrist. She tells Montag “‘I’ve got to go see my psychiatrist now. They make me go. I make up things to say. I don’t know what he thinks of me. He says I’m a regular onion! I keep him busy peeling away the layers’” (Bradbury 20). This quote shows that she is saving face because she doesn’t want the psychiatrist to know her inner thoughts and feelings in order to avoid conflict. However, Clarisse contradicts Goffman when talking to Montag. For instance, she tells Montag, “‘They want to know what I do with all my time. I tell them that sometimes I just sit and think. But I won’t tell them what. I’ve got them running’” (Bradbury 20). This statement shows that she saves face with everyone except Montag. Clarisse also states, “‘You’re one of the few who put up with me’” (Bradbury 21). This statement supports that Clarisse doesn’t save face with Montag because he is, to her surprise, willing to listen to her and think about what she says. Lastly, Clarisse makes Montag question his happiness by protruding through his mask that he is using to save face. Up until the point when Clarisse asks Montag if he is happy, Montag had been living behind his mask of happiness. However, Clarisse causes Montag to question his happiness, which alters his eagerness to save face because he becomes self-conscious about how other people view him, especially his coworkers. For example, after asking Beatty a question about the past, Montag mentions, “Fool, thought Montag to himself, you’ll give it away” (Bradbury 31). This shows that Clarisse has influenced Montag to question his profession and history, but he knows he has to be careful about what he says aloud. Therefore, Clarisse supports Goffman’s theory most of the time in the novel Fahrenheit 451.

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  75. Montag in parts of the book Fahrenheit 451 is trying to keep a secret, he has a book hidden in his house in the ventilation. in a conversation with Beatty Montag tries to save his face. his conversation was "I've tried to imagine," Montag said "just how it would feel. I mean to have firemen burn our houses and our books." Beatty responded "we haven't any books." "but if we did had some." said Montag "you got some?" Beatty said "no" Montag replied swiftly. (Bradbury 34) in this chat Montag supports an argument that Erving Goffman had "I have already said that a person will have two points of view- a defensive orientation to save his own face and a protective orientation to save others faces." (Goffman 3) I believe that Montag was trying to save his face as a fireman when he was being defensive about the books. here he tries to save his face, by saying that he does not own any books ,but he is protecting his face. his face is slightly broken when he is talking to the chief about the books.

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    1. Form: 2/3 You did not use capitals at the beginning of sentences and some more advanced words could be used but other than that I think you did a very good job.
      Content: 2/3 You backed up your claim well with a lot of information however you could have used more points Goffman made.

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  76. Reader Response
    The excerpt from On Face Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction by Erving Goffman contains many components that pertain to the main character, Guy Montag, in Ray Bradbury's book Fahrenheit 451. On Face Work states that in society people put on different "faces" when they are around different people as a way to cover up in order to avoid looking other than normal. An example of this is "the phrase 'to save one's face' appears to refer to the process by which the person sustains an impression for others that he has not lost face" (Goffman 7). Montag uses the save face technique when he meets Clarisse McClellan "'I am very much in love!' He tried to conjure up a face to fit the words but there was no face" (Bradbury 22). Also, in On Face Work page nine states that a person may become defensive when trying to save face which relates to when Montag's boss questions Montag if he is in possession of any books and Montag responds rather defensively by saying no repeatedly on page 34. In conclusion, Goffman's theory on society putting on faces is backed up by Bradbury's characters in Fahrenheit 451.

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  77. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  78. Cameron Farella
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, period 6
    30 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal: “Fahrenheit 451”
    In the article, On Face Work: An Analysis of the Ritual Elements in Social Interaction, author Erving Goffman uses consistent metaphors throughout his piece, likewise, Ray Bradbury uses consistent metaphors throughout his novel, Fahrenheit 451. Both authors do this to express a grander underlying message. Erving Goffman uses terms such as “to save face” and “to lose face” throughout his article as recurring metaphors because you cannot literally lose or save a face. However, throughout the piece we discover “to lose face” really means to be wrong in face or shamefaced, and “to save face” means to sustain an impression that one has not lost their face. The insightful message these metaphors exemplify is to demonstrate how some people are more expressive in their emotions, and how others try and cover theirs by not letting their face get the best of them. In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury uses the most important element of his book to express and foreshadow a greater meaning, this first appears in the statement “In his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head…” (Bradbury 1). In this novel, the number 451 is a metaphor to represent this is the temperature in Fahrenheit that books burn at. This introduces us to the idea he is a firefighter and burns books as his occupation. This metaphor foreshadows his character development because it indicates that his occupation is not necessary a noble one, thus the reader sees this metaphor as the beginning of his character development.
    Word Count: 247

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  79. Buffy Kerestan
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, Period 6
    Readers Response Journal 2: "Fahrenheit 451"
    The theme of losing face from Face-Work is demonstrated in Fahrenheit 451 as Montag slowly loses his face as a fireman, showing a change in his values. Up until this point, Montag has appropriately displayed the face of a firefighter because until meeting Clarisse he believed in his work and acted out the fireman lines. Through interacting with Clarisse, he has picked up several of her behaviors, such as questioning and observing. He begins using Clarisse's lines in conversations with fellow firemen. These lines are not appropriate for firemen, so he is slowly losing face. He questions "Was- was it always like this? The firehouse, our work?" (Bradbury 34). The firemen then mock him, “That’s rich!" then pull out the manual, taking a "protective orientation" (9 Goffman) of Montag's face, though becoming more reluctant as this is only one of several incidents of Montag not acting within the fireman "role" by using intelligent observer lines. Lines in their very nature are "a pattern of verbal and nonverbal acts by which he expresses his view of the situation and through this his evaluation of the participants, especially himself." By not using fireman lines he shows that he is choosing a different point of view than the firemen. By choosing this point of view, it shows that he values observation and the truth over the traditions that have been passed down to him and are encouraged by the society.

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  80. Audrey Borzellino
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H, period 5
    29 September 2015

    Reader Response Journal 2: Fahrenheit 451

    Erving Goffman's "On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction" can be related to Ray Bradbury's character Montag in Fahrenheit 451 through the emphasis Goffman (Goffman 7-9) puts on one's "face," "image of self," "approved social attributes," how "to save one's face," and to prevent the "loss of face." Goffman defines "face" as "the positive social value a person effectively claims for himself by the line others assume he has taken during a particular contact." Montag's main face or role in society is as a fireman, but a more genuine face is progressively becoming present in the novel. While in his normal firehouse setting, in a society in which books are not allowed, this new face is presented through the quote "Once upon a time..." (Bradbury 31). Montag's new face consists of a curiosity for the unknown, a desire to read, and an inclination to think. A single person can not sustain two faces for long, as one will take precedence over the other at some point and may appear unexpectedly. This is shown in Montag's circumstance, and he will eventually lose his fireman role and take on that of a reader and a thinker.

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  81. Camryn Philips
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 Honors, Period 5
    01 October 2015
    Dialectical Journal #2
    “Every person lives in a world of social encounters, involving him either face-to-face or mediated contact with other participants,” (Goffman 7). In Ray Bradbury’s, Fahrenheit 451, Guy Montag meets Clairisse McClellan who greets him by saying, “And you must be… the fireman” (Bradbury 6). “She raised her eyes from his professional symbols.” (Bradbury 6) This encounter creates a “defensive orientation toward saving his own face,” (Goffman 9) Clairisse says “I don't mean to be insulting. It’s just I love to watch people too much I guess.” (Bradbury 8). This is where Montag’s “defensive orientation” as he fires back by saying “ Well doesn't this mean anything to you?” (Bradbury 8) “He tapped the numeral 451 stitched on his char-colored sleeve,” (Bradbury 8). This moment goes on to be a catalyst for Montag’s path to changing his face. This is later manifested in the novel when Montag shows great interest in wanting to know more about Clairisse McClellan and her thoughts. As a reader, I hope Montag goes on to continue his path to writing a different script for himself.

    Word Count: 203

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  82. Koa Duvauchelle-Tomanogi
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H, p. 6
    1 October 2015
    Dialectical Journal: Fahrenheit 451
    Further on in the novel, we find out that Clarisse goes missing after a week and we get a preview of Montag’s reaction to that, and Montage uses a “save face” in order to protect himself from admitting that he’s not happy with his life. “Good-bye. Good-bye…”(31, Ray Bradbury) we see Montag’s last conversation with Clarisse before she goes missing. I suspect that maybe Clarisse was taken during her check-up with her psychiatrist, and the society must have known that she was lying and only telling them what they need to hear. The fact that Clarisse was taken away causes Montag to think of her and this causes him to change moods which eventually leads to how he acts at his job. When going to work, Montag enters from the back door in order to avoid the hound because the hound starts to growl at him when he walks by. Ray Bradbury’s idea of the hound is that it can detect and changes in people’s behavior and mood, but is programmed to detect when people have been reading or harboring stacks of books. “Once upon a time…” (34 Ray Bradbury) Montag says, but realizes that this is his inner Clarisse speaking but in doing so he notices that his co-workers find him strangely weird for using such words because these words are only found in books. This close encounter causes Montag to use the “save face” tactic which as stated by Evring Goffman, “The phrase “to save one’s face” appears to refer to the process by which the person sustains an impression for others that he has not lost face.” (Paragraph 1) Therefore, Ray Bradbury does this to show the audience that Montag is slowly changing to what he believed was wrong and evil.

    Word Count: 295

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  83. Hannah Tarbell
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 Honors, Period 4
    1 October 2015
    Reader’s Response Journal: Fahrenheit 451
    The novel, Fahrenheit 451, and the article, “On Face Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction” greatly relate to each other with multiple examples throughout the text. The matters that relate most from the article to the novel are what is called “losing face” (Goffman 7) - which is where you have stepped out of the social norm because someone has put you in an unfamiliar situation- and “saving face” (Goffman 7) - where an individual tries to help grasp social norm once again. On page 26, in Fahrenheit 451, Montag starts to “lose face” (Goffman 7), when the Captain asks him, “Why? You got a guilty conscience about something?” He’s losing face because the Captain has asked him a question that he is not used to and has to “go off script” as Mrs. Bugni explained. Unlike most people, the Captain doesn’t try to help him “save face” (Goffman 7) ; instead, he does the opposite and watches him struggle with the situation at hand. On the other hand, Clarisse helps Montag “save face” (Goffman 7) when she changes the subject after asking him “Why haven’t you any daughters like me, if you love children so much?” (Bradbury 28), making it so he doesn’t have to discuss his personal life. As we can see, there are various examples in Fahrenheit 451, of what Goffman portrays in his article about “losing face” and “saving face” (Goffman 7).
    Word Count: 256

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  84. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  85. Shaniah Walker
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11, Period 04
    29 September 2015
    Readers Response Journal: “F451 pages 1-24”
    Ray Bradbury paints an abundant amount of illustrations of a beautiful performance of saving face and defying the act captured and displayed in the characters of Fahrenheit 451 from every character interaction to the next. Montag and Clarisse first encounter starts the dance of preforming for instance “Are you happy?” (7 Bradbury) , the simple yet complex set of language asked by Clarisse plants the seed of thinking and forces Montag to dance with the act of attempting to save face displayed when Montag responds to Clarisse posing question and states “ Happy! Of all the nonsense… Of course I’m happy” (8 Bradbury). Montag actions of trying to save face after losing it portrays Erving Goffman depiction of Cooperation in Face work stating “When a face has been threatened, face work must be done” (9 Goffman). Through Bradbury captivated the art of saving face gracefully through metaphoric language laid down page by page, he also captures the art of defying the law of saving face, in other words being ones true self. He does this through the outspoken imaginative teenage figure Clarisse who illustrates this time after time by asking questions that contradict society’s beliefs for example “Do you ever read any of the books you burn?” (2 Bradbury), and through her actions that are drastically different from society’s, she tastes rain, watches sunrises and sunsets, and questions the world that surrounds her in wonder. Clarisse pure sounds of language and thinking shows she is not playing along with the music and dance of the script, but writing her own play. Through the abundant amount of examples of saving face and defying the act Bradbury inspires a new light to perform your own dance and write your own play.

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    1. You had a very nice word choice and the sentences flowed very nicely. You gave very good examples and i really enjoyed reading this piece. Overall 3 on both the form and content.

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    2. You always seem to impress. Your language is beautiful, and you state your point clearly. Reading and listening to your writing is always wonderful. You use great examples from the text and state it how it is. 3/3.

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  86. MaeLee De Vries
    Professor Bugni
    English 11 H
    21 September, 2015
    Reading Response Journal: Fahrenheit 451
    According to Erving Goffman’s article, “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction,” Montag has different “faces.” When he’s with Clarisse, Mildred, the men at the firehouse, or by himself, Montag performs differently. Montag does this, so he refrains from “loosing face.” With Clarisse, Montag can be a thinker, but at one point Montag tries to “save face” when Clarisse asks “Are you happy?” (Bradbury 10). After this question is put forth, Montag tries to save face by saying, “Happy! Of all the nonsense.” (Bradbury 10). At the firehouse Montag must pull out a different script and play by it. As a fireman, there are protocols Montag must follow and one of those requires the state of being professional and doing what is called normal. For example, Montag must follow five rules which require him to listen for the alarm, start fires swiftly, and return back to the firehouse promptly. If Montag does not comply with these rules, suspicion will arise and Montag will have numerous problems with which to deal. Alone, Montag can go to his “backstage.” In this place, Montag can be the self no one else sees. He actually ends up crying, which is something Montag would never do in front of others. All of this takes place because Montag has different faces for different people and “Once he takes on a self-image expressed through face he will be expected to live up to it.” (Goffman 7).
    Word Count: 260 

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    1. Form:3/3
      I liked how you used the word "protocol", it demonstrates your expertise on what you are talking about and it also justifies you as a reliable resource in case anyone wants to cite your writing.

      Content: 3/3
      I really enjoyed your quotes from the text, it demonstrates and supports your understanding of the passage!

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  87. Heather Lytle-Flood
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, period 4
    25 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal: Fahrenheit 451
    In the article titled “On Face Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interactions,” written by Erving Goffman, he tells us that people are always trying to save face. This is very true when it comes to Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451,” between Guy Montag and Clarisse McClellan’s characters. Bradbury wrote “He wore his happiness like a mask and the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back.” (Bradbury 12) The character Montag was caught off guard and he “lost face” (Goffman) when Clarisse asked him if he was happy. Goffman said that “A social relationship is a way in which the person is forced to trust his self-image and face to the tact and good conduct of others.” (Goffman 12) This relates to Bradbury’s character Montag in many ways, when Clarisse asked Montag if he was happy he didn’t think about it before he said of course. Then she questioned him again and really starts to ponder whether he is actually happy or not and that is when he realized that he had lost face because of a question by a girl that he had just met. He tried to protect his self-image by saying yes without thinking about it because it was an instant reaction but then he realizes that he wasn’t and that is when it started to go downhill. Bradbury uses Goffman’s idea in “Fahrenheit 451” when it comes to self-image and trying to protect yourself through the characters Guy Montag and Clarisse McClellan.
    Word Count: 287

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    1. I like the way you tied the article to the story so well. It made it easier to connect the dots and get your point across.

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  88. Debbie Estrada
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 Honors, p.6
    30 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal 2
    While reading through On Face Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction by Erving Goffman, I stumbled upon an intriguing quote on page 11 that states “The enthusiasm of farewells compensates the relationship for the harm that is about to be done to it by separation”. In Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 Clarisse dismisses herself from the tight bond she has with Montag by leaving in a manner in which, cleverly, no harm can be caused. For example on page 10, it describes a mysterious disappearance which states “‘Are you happy?’, she asked, ‘Am I what?’ he cried. But she was gone.” In both of these dismisses Clarisse leaves Montag’s presence so suddenly in a slick manner that it’s like a gradually dimming light bulb, and before you know it the room is dark and lonely. It’s almost like a fast car with your best friend inside, as it swishes by you on the side of the road: the car goes by so fast that you don’t even have time to analyze whether it was really your friend in the car, but you are left with a series of doubts referring to this event, which can extend over a long period of time. Montag never really leaves Clarisse due to her mysterious disappearances because he keeps her in mind in everything he does, almost like a cliff hanger that doesn’t kill you because you are still hanging on to that cliff. On page 31, Clarisse gives Montag a flesh wound by stating “Well, I got to be going. Goodbye. Goodbye…”, This simple word wounds Montag as she seems to have physically vanished into nothing for a while, but continually persists in Montag’s memory.

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  89. Christopher Ortega
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, Period 5
    29 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal: Fahrenheit 451 and On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction
    In Ray Bradbury’s dystopian novel, “Fahrenheit 451”, mechanical hounds surveillance the municipality that takes place in the story. These hounds completely ignore the “image of self-delineated in terms of approved social attributes”, (Goffman 7), that has been focused upon on Goffman’s “On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Elements in Social Interaction.” With the mechanical hounds being “a good rifle that can fetch its own target and guarantees the bull’s eye every time,” (Bradbury 27), they’re programmed to smell the chemical imbalances on people which leads them straight to the “backdoor” of every citizen. With the Mechanical hound being an outlier to Goffman’s theory, this makes an effect on the protagonist, Guy Montag. The concept of saving face becomes heavily practiced with Guy Montag, because he starts to form thoughts that are considered illegal and taboo to the society in lives in, so he puts on a mask in an attempt to save face so he does not meet his downfall. Goffman’s theory can be applied to this work of literature by Ray Bradbury because the main character tries to save his own face due to the society he lives in, especially since there is an exception to the theory in his town which are the mechanical hounds.

    Word Count: 203

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    1. Interesting perspective. it differed from all the others that said the same quote. it gave me a new way to look at the purpose of his face from a characters view.

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  90. I have to say getting ready for the PSAT, is very stress and honestly giving me anxiety. I don't know or understand why but it just is I guess. i hope everyone including myself does well.

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  91. Liberty Pfeffer
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, Period 04
    29 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal: Ray Bradbury Fahrenheit 451 and On Face-Work
    When using Erving Goffman’s On Face-Work to analysis the characters in Fahrenheit 451, when comparing Montag and Mildred, who are always trying to save face, to Clarisse who doesn’t save face because she is her authentic self and the different correlation to how society views them. When Clarisse asks Montag if he is happy, he automatically goes to save face. “Of course I’m happy. What does she think? I’m not?” (Bradbury 10) Montag feels threatened by this question because it puts him in a position to lose face. Like most of their society, Montag goes to extreme lengths to try to preserve his established position in society, making sure no one thinks any differently of him. Mildred too, saves face after overdosing on sleeping pills as she is being confronted by Montag. She denies that anything happened. “Didn’t sleep well. Feel terrible.” (Bradbury 18) Goffman touches on the fact that everyone has their own face saving practices that they do in order to not break face. “Each person, subculture, and society seems to have its own characteristic repertoire of face-saving practices.” (Goffman 8) Comparably, Clarisse doesn’t try to save face, because she shows everyone her authentic self. By doing so she is scene differently in their society. “I’ve got to see my psychiatrist now. They make me go.” (Bradbury 22) Since she doesn’t fit society’s norm, People feel threatened by her and her family. Goffman’s theory of saving face and scripts play a crucial role in Fahrenheit 451 and how their society is constructed and why most of their citizens save face and have scripts.
    Word Count: 287

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  92. Jonathan Kelaty
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11H, p. 4
    30 September 2015
    Reader Response Journal
    Ray Bradbury uses ambiguity in dialogue in order to include additional meaning to Clarisse’s words, “Sometimes I’m ancient” (27). Within the context of the conversation, Clarisse is saying that she appears wise in her words and her thoughts when she was describing her views of the current state of society. Although, she could be using ancient as a way of describing her mindset as very old fashioned in relation to the time period in the novel. It can be assumed that before this time period, there was a time when individual thought and insightful thinking and learning through reading was encouraged. Clarisse is an individual who likes to learn, and she shows great interest in learning from Montag through her foreign questions of self-identification. Bradbury could also be using this dialogue to also mean she’s ancient in her thought mentality in the sense that it’s similar to the mentality of the previous generations. Because of this ambiguity, Bradbury effectively presents Clarisse as a 4th dimensional character, thus providing an adequate catalyst for Montag’s impending realizations of what it is that he sees in the world.

    Word Count: 185

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    1. Have you written the RRJ that connects Goffman's theory to Bradbury's novel?

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  93. Paige Johnson
    Mrs. Bugni
    English 11 H, Period 5
    29 September 2015
    Dialectical Journal
    Erving Goffman explains in his work, " On Face-Work: An Analysis of Ritual Element in Social Interaction" that people's main priority in socialization is to preserve their 'face' or how they are perceived. In the book "Fahrenheit 451" the main character Guy Montog's face is taken from him by Clarisse, “He wore his happiness like a mask and the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no was of going to knock on her door and ask for it back” (Bradbury 12). In this line Montog states that he had his own face for him to deceive himself and when she took it away he was left only to question himself and the world around him. “The combined effect of the rule of self-respect and the rule of considerateness is that the person tends to conduct himself during an encounter so as to maintain both his own face and the face of the other participants. This means that the line taken by each participant is usually allowed to prevail, and each participant is allowed to carry off the role he appears to have chosen for himself” (Goffman 7). This expands the importance of Montog’s face to himself that it not only deceives others but also himself.
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