Sunday, October 4, 2015

Community Journal for Monday, October 5, 2015 [English 12 Honors]


COMMUNITY JOURNAL
Franny and Zooey by J.D. Salinger

“The rest, with very little exaggeration, was books. Meant-to-be-picked up books. Permanently-left-behind books. Uncertain-what-to-do-with books" (180).


Please comment on one student entry.

47 comments:

  1. The way that I interpret the quote is that it expresses that Seymour as well as the rest of his family had/has no idea what to do with the books. Seymour in the sense that none of it helped him get past his urge to commit suicide, thus the “Permanently-left-behind books” (180) sentence. The family had the belief that none of the books were to be touched because they would destroy whatever they had left of Seymour as expressed in the “Uncertain-what-to-do-with books” (180) sentence.

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  2. During the section of the book when Zooey ventures into Seymour and Buddy's former room, Salinger vividly depicts a space haphazardly scattered with books of all kinds. I really connected to this element of the book because of the abundance of books and literature in my own home. The description of setting that accompanied Zooey's actions brought the scene to life and added a realistic, sentimental element to the book.

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    1. Why are books important to you? Which genre do you enjoy the most?

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  3. We know from reading about all of the kids in the Glass family, they put a lot of importance on reading to gain knowledge and also for religious gain. Books had to be the main source for the knowledge that Buddy and Seymour used to learn about religions, mysterious teachings, and other out of the norm teachings. When Zooey walks into Buddy and Seymour's old room, he realizes the books, and also salutes the room as a whole when he throws a handkerchief over his head before he "sets foot" in the room. Zooey's realization of the books is sprung forth by curiosity, causing him to raise such questions as: What are in those books? Are these the books that Buddy and Seymour read and told us to believe? Did they even read all of these? Should I dare to read these books? When Zooey saw these books a curiosity arose in him, and maybe he will be curious enough to venture through these books and read them for the sake of his brothers.

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    1. This is interesting. I never thought about the curiosity that Zooey probably felt upon seeing all of the books. It also makes me wonder now if Zooey decided to read any of them.

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  4. Each book is a situation in life, you just have to look closely enough. The meant-to-be-picked up books are situations in life when you know exactly how to handle the situation, it’s like second-hand knowledge. The permanently-left-behind books are situations that you have to go through, but you don’t necessarily enjoy, it’s like someone extremely close to you moves on, in any sense, it hurts for a while, but it makes you a stronger person at the end of the line. The uncertain-what-to-do-with books are somewhat unnecessary to explain. Obviously, you’re going through a situation that you do not quite know how to handle. Its life, at one point in time, absolutely everything is going to go wrong on you; however, it’s up to either accept that or get back to work.

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    1. The comparison of books to life situations show how much these books can affect even our daily lives.

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  5. There are very few things in life that I enjoy more than curling up on the floor with a cup of coffee and a good book, with music playing in the background and the smell of fresh pages wafting through the air. If we’ve known each other for a week, I’ve probably asked you which books you’d recommend. And if we’ve known each other for a week and a day, I’ve probably purchased all of them. I know that there are books hidden in every nook and cranny of my room. I know that many of those books have never been read and probably never will be, yet I find myself constantly craving more. There is something intensely intimate about walking through the aisles of a bookstore, picking up books with nice covers or names or authors you know but don’t really know and flipping through the pages. I know that there are books hidden in every nook and cranny of my room. I know that many of those books have never been read and probably never will be, yet here I am, standing in Barnes & Noble once again. I’m starting to think I might just be a book hoarder.

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    1. This is very creative. I love the repetition you use of "I know that there are books hidden in every nook and cranny of my room. I know that many of those books have never been read and probably never will be." Your post involves a lot of imagery; I was picturing the scene in my head as I read it.

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  7. Once I've settled down in a nice house with a tolerable job, I'm going to buy a bookcase. A large bookcase with several shelves, and I'll revert to my old love for reading, and each time I read a book that changed my life in any way, even the smallest, I'll put it on that shelf. It could influence my writing style, my life choices, my outlook on the future, or even my interpersonal relationships. Whether or not I plan on reading them again, never again, hated it or loved it. Maybe it doesn't even have to be a book; maybe it can a piece of any media, movie, game, or article. Nonetheless, my collection will consist of numerous hand-picked stories, all of which I will (hopefully) one day pull down from that sturdy shelf and share that part of me with someone else and hope that they understand me just a little bit more. Perhaps they would mostly consist of discarded books, perhaps forgotten books, but also permanently-a-part-of-me books.

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    1. You're such an amazing writer Sydney!

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  8. I think this quote is showing that Seymour and Buddy's books are left exactly how they have always been. This is why they are described as "Left-behind" books. Whenever you lose someone close to you, whether it be to death or to other circumstances, they almost always seem to leave something behind. This quote is making sure to point out that Buddy and Seymour have left their books behind and due to the fact that no one else in the Glass family wants to move them, they become ""Uncertain-what-to-do-with" books. The books are a symbol of the absence of Buddy and Seymour.

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  10. I think this quote is significant in the fact that once a child passes away, or leaves home there is a lot of confusion on whether to keep things or get rid of them. My family relates to this because when my sister moved out, my mom wanted all her stuff to go with her, but when my brother passed we clung to all of his stuff as memories. For Bessie And Les in their home, it's uncertainty whether they should hold on to these things and memories for a child they lost or for their child that left home also. It shows how everything's untouched from when the brothers lived there and how you can tell what meant a lot to the boys. Not only do I think it's the uncertainty with their parents but also from when Seymour and Buddy lived in that room and things they never got around to do, like put away or get rid of their literature. I relate to this because I also have a shelf that is full of books that has overflown and now instead of a nice stack, I have a book fitting in which every direction I can get it to stay. I always say I will lend them to someone or sell them, but I never do.

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    1. This is so true. I honestly feel like when someone leaves our life through their will, we don't really keep what they leave behind, but when they pass away we want to keep everything that belonged to them to hold as memories. I personally think it's crazy because we never know what can happen so I personally keep everything that can bring me memories regardless of the way that they left our life.

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  11. I think that this quote is about how Seymour and Buddy surrounded themselves with books in order to become more knowledgeable.Now the thing about their books is that some of them had always been on a queue for either of the boys to read but neither of them had ever gotten around to it. Some of the books had been read once and then never read again (or at least that's what I took from "permanently left behind books"). Some of the books had even left these two boys puzzled. What these books really could represent is the knowledge that the boys received from each book, as in was the knowledge something they always wanted to find out about but never had the time to or the knowledge was permanently left behind or the knowledge was something that they were uncertain about. Whatever the knowledge might be it overly fills the space of Seymour and Buddy.

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  12. In my room, I have a book case where I keep all my books or notebooks. However, I have different categories for them. One is the books that I have read and wouldn't mind reading again, another is books that I have read and didn't enjoy but wouldn't want to get rid of them. On the other two sections, I have books that were read for educational purposes only, and lastly books that I am currently reading/ books that I purchased that I need to read on my free time.

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    1. I've only recently collected enough books to justify obtaining a bookshelf, let alone try categorizing them. Nice job with the free time literacy practice.

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  13. Different people view books in different way. I view books as a collection of words meant to change something in your life. These “meant-to-be-picked-up books” are the ones most people care about. The books that your friend tells you about and insist that you have to read it. They are the books that make a person’s day, or tell them see things in a different light. They are the books that are enjoyed when read. These books are the ones that help you escape reality and be submerged in a world of color or no color, of sound and music or silence, of happiness or sadness. These books are the most important in life because they can do so much for you and for me. That is what these “meant-to-be-picked-up books” are.

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    1. Interesting take on the given quote, I completely agree that's what "meant-to-be-picked-up books" are.

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  14. Everyone runs into those books one time or another where you buy it or rent it, and never get around to reading it. As for me, in my room i have three stacks of books. One for unread books, the second for finished, and the third for my all time favorites that I'd like to read again. Most likely ill read one of my favorites again before i read a new one. This is because I already know it is good so why waste my time with a new one. So the unread pile just sits there collecting dust.

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    1. Which books are on your favorite stack?

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  15. It's the kind of book that defines a person. Maybe it's the quality of character that determines the way the person will look at their books. In the way that people judge other people on their car, do others judge others based on the kinds of books they have? If I keep a collection of textbooks on a shelf, how does that come off to others? Should I choose to only showcase the big books, am I arrogant? Or is the examination of someones book ownership a genuine inside into their soul? Are books a creation of man that was meant to be created? Books.

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    1. My bookshelf is like a trophy display case. It is on those shelves that I display all of the texts and works that shaped me into the person I am today. It's the work of all of those authors that helped to shape my beliefs and ideals. These books hold so much power.

      Also, I love the ending of just "books."

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    2. Maybe everyone has a bookshelf to show the world that shows the personality they want to have and a personal bookshelf of their actual self.

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  16. I think this is significant because it relates to loss. The loss of a child in any way can be a really hard thing to deal with. It would be hard to let go and hard to keep things. I would constantly be reminded of them and having their things around would be really tough. not knowing to keep or get rid of it would be tough. The books are filling the space of the lost child. They represent knowledge but they also represent the person itself.

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  17. After Seymour had committed suicide, he left behind all of his books. His books are described as "Meant-to-be-picked up books. Permanently-left-behind books. Uncertain-what-to-do-with books." This is as to say ubnto itself, a very literal statement that is being made. He left behind all the books that he was meant to read, books that were permanently left behind never to be read, and with no use any more, ergo, they don't know what to do with the books he left behind. a very sad but touching quote, to say the least.

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  18. There are particular books that will stick with us for the entirety of our lives: books that change us, books that shape us, and books that break us. In J.D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey, it is acknowledged that these books, these pieces of their readers, are left behind after someone dies.
    To me, the most important thing in a book is what I take from it. I can only hope that my copies of books that have impacted me could be put to use in impacting someone else. I have shelves filled with books in my home, and I simply couldn't fathom leaving all of those ideas there to rot. There are life lessons from every text I have read. William Blake taught me to embrace the miracles and beauty of life, no matter what force they were created by. John Green emphasized the importance of self-reflection and self-understanding as well as the well regarded fear of existential crisis. Even Salinger taught me to recognize when I am surrounding myself with falseness and to be aware of my own superiority complex. All of these books caused me to see something in a different light, and imagining them just there to rot after I am gone is petrifying. The greatest gift we can leave the world with is the gift of knowledge.

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    1. While the idea of leaving the ideas of the books behind is somewhat scary the fact of the matter is, just like in Salinger's work there will be people who find them. Just as Zooey found (or at least acknowledged were there) Seymour's someone will find yours. The knowledge that one leaves behind can be put in place with memoirs or just stories told about the person, but there isn't anything more valuable then someone picking up the same book that you had, and having that same feeling you had.

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  19. What of a person? When someone dies, do they really cease to exist? Every memory, every belonging, every book stays when someone goes. What do we do with all of this now? When someone passes away, those of us still here are not only haunted by remembrance, but nostalgia through the materialist world. What do we do with a person's entire life? How do we move on?

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  20. Books always seem to have meaning. When you see the cover your mind starts to race and even though your not supposed to you judge every inch of that cover; however, that gut feeling can change from reading one page and the next and the one after that. Sometimes you can see the most beautiful cover and begin to wonder of all the beauty inside only to be let down by a story that never got your attention. To relate back to Franny and Zooey the cover gave me an idea that it would be a simplistic novel but the green spine showed the idea of some pop of drama or something however, I was let down and found no drama, and a complex story that never gained my attention as much as the cover did.

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    1. Very interesting take on the book's persona. I like your interpretation of how the color contrasts on the cover create curiosity for the readings.

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  21. I think that Salinger is trying to express how many books there were in the room. Salinger often goes over what a reader might expect in his descriptions and detail. He wants the reader to know that the family’s collection of books has quite a variety from trivial reads to inspiring novels. Salinger makes it apparent that each type of book has its own status in the eyes of Zooey.

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  22. I want to be a regular at a local library. Each book I read I want to write inside the cover one of the following, "meant to be read", "meant to be kept", and "meant to be unsure". If I read a book that I feel effected my life positively I will write "meant to be read". If I read a book that should be revisited in times of trouble I will write, "meant to be kept", and lastly a book that springs an idea into my mind that I just can not seem to find importance to, but can not leave alone, I will write "meant to be unsure". As I go along my days at this library I will continue this ritual to warn future readers of what they are getting into, and slowly this library will become a safe haven for readers that need a change, need help in a struggle, or just need a fresh idea to ponder about.

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    1. This is such a cute, creative idea. I wish libraries were cool with people writing in their books, it could create such a sense of community even among strangers who happen to pick up the same book.

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    2. love your entry it was really interesting

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  23. What does one do with the books that they have already read? Books that had kept you warm inside, and books that had shown you an entirely different world. Books that had left you sitting with tears slowly dribbling down your face, and books that had left you emotionless. What can one do with the books that had completely changed them, but haven't been picked up off of the shelf since. The books sit there mindlessly as the dust clings to their spines. They await the moment that a hand, new or old, reaches for them once again. They long to have their spines worn, and to be written on. So what does one do with a book that they've already read? Well, I suppose that answer is easy. They sit on the shelf until someone decides to pick them up once again, because books are made to be read, reread, shown off, written on, torn, to collect dust, or given away. However one does not forget that feeling. That feeling of a book, no matter the content.

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  24. I feel as though my great passion for reading has subsided into near nothingness. Like most other children, in elementary school reading was a favorite hobby of mine. I would read a book a day, drinking in every word like I was parched. Presently I find I have little leisure time in my life, and of that precious little leisure time, I choose not to spend it reading. Why would I? Where's the excitement in that?
    I think somewhere, deep inside, a small part of me is screaming. I would not readily admit it, but it is far too easy for me to get lost in a good book. Books I do not have to explicate, books I do not have to analyze and dissect until there is nothing left but a hollow resentment towards reading. Books that are not substantially philosophical, books that have a cliche plot line, books with terrible love triangles and overdone adventures. Those are the books I find solace in. Maybe if I could simply sit back and enjoy a good, corny novel without feeling inferior to intellectuals around me reading their intellectual books, I would do it more often. The books that speak to me are nothing special, nothing profound, and maybe that's why they are special.

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  25. Everybody these days has books in their home. Whether they enjoy reading or not they have some sort of novel laying around their house. For most people, once they finish reading a book they place it on a shelf among all of their other books. To many people this shelf has little significance to them but to others it is like a trophy. This trophy reflects on the accomplishments you made throughout your life as a reader. Whether you enjoyed the books or not does not matter you still accomplished something with the novel you read.

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  26. It was clear that this library had been searched quickly and furiously.

    The books were scattered along the floor. Some were open, some were closed. Many had pages torn out, only to be crinkled and discarded as whoever ravaged this sacred place of knowledge had searched for the one thing they were looking for. Third bent down to sift through some of the crumpled pages. "Do you think he found it?" he asked Seventh, as he turned over and inspected another book. "I doubt it. If he had, this place wouldn't still be standing." Seventh pulled a book down from one of the selves, revealing a hidden compartment in the self it rested on. "Sometimes it pays to have a more delicate approach." she said with a smile as she reached into the compartment and removed a single slip of paper. The numbers 4, 2, and 5 were scrawled across its surface. Seventh read the numbers over a few times before handing it off to Third, who took a quick look and asked "What is this supposed to mean?" Having already started walking again, Seventh stopped to answer his question. "My first guess would be that those numbers are a clue to finding the book he was looking for." she continued on towards the fourth bookshelf from the front of the library, and examined the third shelf, before grabbing the fifth book. The bookshelf shook, and then began to sink into the ground as Seventh let the false book snap back into place, revealing a staircase. "Bingo." Seventh whispered with a smile as she began her descent.

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  27. The phrase "don't judge a book by its cover" can be applied to anything and everything. Meeting a person who you can see, read, and relate to like a book is worth keeping on your shelf. The ones you can't or don't may meet its end like one of those books that you would never read again and end up in a forgotten box, fated to never see the light of day. And it’s those worn books that takes the spot beside your night stand, the constant mess or rigid order that you see day to day that reminds you, and teaches you, and comforts you when your wandering eyes finally settle on the growing pile while keeping in mind the ones adorning your shelf of memory. As stories add on and memories grow, the constant paper-thin evidence would continue to grow and support you as the bigger journey unravels. Other piles would grow; the ones that you can never let go and the darkest stories that should never see the light of day again. Plenty more would stem from the already formed ones. But in the end, all would spell the days of ones given life, and the stories would be passed down with the foundation of a house built with it, and it would remember you when you yourself cannot. Evidence amassed within innocent volumes.

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  28. Once upon a time, there was a little girl who loved to read. She loved her books and you would never see her without a book in her hand. One day, she came across a book and, although simple and short, the children's book had slowly taken a large presence in her life. Every year, she took this book with her to "Favorite Book" day at school. She read this little book over and over, knowing that, one day, this book may affect another persons' life as well as her own. She knew that she would someday come across a point in her life when, someday, she would be like the little girl she read about, insecure and lonely, but, at this point in her life, she would be like the old lady, giving and thoughtful to others. Later in her life, when she, in essence, followed the little girls’ footsteps, she, once again, read the book. She knew what she had done wrong. She turned around and corrected what she knew was wrong. Ever since, the little girl has followed the fictional girls’ path. She no longer cares about what others say. She continues to follow her own path, giving and being thoughtful towards others because, she too, met a lovely old lady. The simple, meant-to-be-me, children’s book still lies, beaten up, torn, tattered, and reread by a wide variety of children, young and old, at the little girls’ bedside. She continues to speak to other little boys and girls about what it was like to be on both ends, in hopes that she will, someday, be their old lady.

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  29. Authors know how to leave the reader wanting more from their stories and books by giving the readers something to take as a part of their reading. The reader is then may to take in once piece of memory or fact from the story that they feel is worth keeping and applying throughout their lives.It can be read and reviewed or it may just stay their as a remembrance of that memory. A memory that could stay on the bookshelves for other people to glance at as they are walking by. A memory is something the close to each individual as they read as either takes it with them or leaves it on their shelves for everyone else to see. The memory is only for the individual to understand and others to just notice an glance at each others memory.

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  30. I really love the way that Salinger describes these books. It is very effective because it hits the reader emotionally. These books are in Buddy's and Seymour's room were meant to be picked up, but never were. They are permanently left behind because Seymour is dead and Buddy has moved away from home. The family is now uncertain about what to do with them because they don't ever go in the room. I feel like these descriptions are very literal, and that makes them great.

    Everyone has books like these in their room. We buy books that we mean to read but never do, we start books that we never finish, and we leave them to collect dust on a bookshelf after we are done with them. The books that a person has can tell you a lot about them. I imagine the books in Buddy's and Seymour's room are very knowledgeable and intellectual. Their books are symbolic of their absence in the family.

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  31. Seymour's book filled room symbolizes his intellect. Getting rid of the books would be an insult to Seymour and what he stood for. Seymour greatly valued intellect. I think he valued it so much that he thought it would be selfish to keep it all to himself. He shared it with his younger siblings, so they could also partake of his wisdom and knowledge. Getting rid of the books would be like getting rid of a part of Seymour. The books remain in Seymour's room as a tribute to the knowledge and wisdom he represents.

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